Tuesday, 2 April 2013

Mick Jagger And The Lads Are Going To Glastonbury, But I'm Not. (A Smallholder midlife crisis?)

I see Mick Jagger and the lads are headlining one of the nights at Glastonbury festival this year?  It just shows you are never too old to rock and roll.  I think your average ticket cost 205 pounds this year and it's sold out.  How times have changed.  One believes that the very first Glastonbury festival ticket cost the princely sum of £1.00 and they gave each punter a FREE pint of milk.  I went to Glastonbury festival in 1989 and it cost me £28.00 for the weekend (me and the world and his wife turned up on the Thursday, it didn't start 'proper' until Friday) and a good time was had by all.

So here I am in 2013 and I have been looking at all the myriad of festivals in Blighty on the Internet.  There are lots of different one's to suit all ages (even if your 49) and music tastes.  There are rock festivals, Jazz festivals, eighties music, real ale, ecological..   You name it.

What age do you think your too old to rock and roll?  I am even thinking of going to Cambridge folk festival.   only thinking like. Perhaps it's my age?  What's next Saga holidays and getting an allotment?  I have already done that, read the book, bought the T shirt.  Suppose I could always get a smallholding?  I am joking.  Wouldn't mind a ride on a steam train.  Am I going through a smallholder/ old rockers midlife crisis?

Here's Neil Young from the fantastic Farm Aid Festival in America.  They put on a yearly concert to raise money for poor farmers.  Perhaps we should have one in Britain or Ireland?   What age are you too old to go to a rock concert?

8 comments:

  1. Yes, the inimitable Mick Jagger, 70 this year, still going strong. If I live to be 70, I hope I've got a fraction of his energy, must be a great feeling to be able to even think about performing at that age. I dunno what he's taking but I want some of it.
    Sold out at £205 a ticket, some big money involved there. Plus all the sideline costs like food and drink and I suppose the inevitable drugs?
    I've never been to a festival or performance of any sort, there's not much happens up here in West Cumbria, and I've never been interested enough to travel. A few small local festivals but nothing on the scale of the big name events.
    Often fancied a big Beer Festival like Munich, but it's something I just never seemed to get round to.
    Been in Amsterdam on Queens Day, the biggest national street party in The Netherlands, that's something to behold.

    Yeah, mid-life crisis, watch out for the hot flushes, inexplicable mood swings, urgent desire to sell up and move abroad, go on foreign holidays, etc. But don't worry, it gets better.

    Sage holidays are very expensive, I once visited the Saga Ruby when it was moored off Whitehaven (it's too big to get into the dock) as part of its round Britain cruise, a nice boat but the average age of clients was probably older than Mick Jagger. It also had a morgue.

    Be good to have a fund-raising effort to help poor farmers, look what Band Aid achieved for the starving millions. Trouble is, there'd be so many worthy cases, there probably wouldn't be very much for each of them, especially by the time bureaucracy and other corruption took their toll on any money raised.

    Another lovely day, blue sky and sunny, but some dark clouds are moving in, looks for rain.
    Raggy cat been out most of the day, back in now catching up on its sleep.

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  2. I agree with you, these are bad times to go to rock festivals. I'm planning to go to the Larmer Tree Festival to celebrate my 40th birthday. Have you heard about it?
    Nice blog, I'm following you since I discovered your blog in a random search.
    Don't give up!

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  3. Hi Cumbrian. You have got an excellent dry sense of humour. Glastonbury festival is like a canvas, 24 hour city for 4 days and nights. They let the punters in on Thursday night, when the bands rhearse. It's an incredible experience. I think rock festivals are like the old wassailing and maypole /holy day festivals of old. Glastonbury used to be England's Woodstock festival. Now it seems to be bigger than anything and more middle class than it's humble roots. Gone are the days when heavy rock bands like Hawkwind and Free headlined it. They also regular raised money for CND. Does CND exist now in England? You won't find any Labour politicians wearing it's badge on their lapels, will you?

    You should go to some of the Camra beer festivals Cumbrian. Great people, music and great food. Camra is like folk music. It's not trendy, you don't have to be fashion conscious and it doesn't matter how old you are. Camra is the most sucessful pressure group in history. God bless all who sail in Camra. Wish we had their pubs here in Ireland.

    Your middle age crisis analysis is bang on the money. I have even thought of moving somewhere warm. I love Mick Jagger's attitude and zest for life. Who wants polyester slacks and a purple rinse or go to an over sixties club? If I end up in an old folks home I'll be saying:

    "Put some Black Sabbath on the Juke box."

    It would be great to have a Farm aid concert in Britain or Ireland. There could be real ale, farm animals (rare breeds), lots of tractors, home produced food and great music.

    Thanks.

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  4. Welcome Honorio, No I hadn't heard of the Larmer Tree Festival. I looked it up on Google. It looks like the perfect music festival: great music, family orientated and you can purchase great food and drink. Thanks for your kind words and I hope you have a great 40th birthday at the Larmer Tree Festival.

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  5. Some pubs, of the few we have left, do a guest ale, changes every couple of weeks, I lived in a hamlet for 6 months and they had a pub, the landlord had a different guest ale every week, it made me realise we can make some really good ales, all different as well. Our local brewery Jennings of Cockermouth are classed as real ale brewery, their ales turn up in all sorts of places as a guest ale.
    Also my brewing efforts produce some really good results, I've discovered there's all sorts of different brews available, the only thing I can't do well is lager, our water's too soft here, but excellent stouts and ales.
    I would probably enjoy a CAMRA festival, but don't suppose many venues will be wheelchair-friendly. and they all involve driving.
    The nearest we get is Silloth vintage show, not very big, but a lot of old tractors, vehicles and stationary engines. I know my age when I can remember owning some of the models now classed as vintage.

    Old folks homes, my mother spent about 3 years in one before she died, such grim and depressing places they are, I've told No 2 son if I ever need to go into one, just stick the silver needle in my arm, it's an existence not a life.

    Love your idea of a Farm Aid type event,sure it would get some great support, bit like a Game Fair with country sports and crafts being demonstrated and live exhibitions.

    Another fine day, rain kept off, even a bit warmer as well.
    Raggy cat out early again.

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  6. Have a look at the CAMRA website Cumbrian if you get the chance. I see that there is a West Cumbria branch. I wish they were active in Ireland. There are a few micro breweries. Sampled one in Cork last year. Never understood why real ale and bitter never took off over here. Not everybody wants to drink stout and lager.

    Wish I lived in or near an hamlet with a real ale pub. Rural living is boring at times with no public transport or community centre or a pub. Drinking at home is a lot cheaper than the pub but you don't have a social life. When I lived in England, I never appreciated how much basic infrastructure is or was. Public transport systems are the veins of a happy society. Would love to see cars reduced to one house per household and councils made to provide public transport for all it's people.

    The Farm Aid festival could be great if it wasn't too celebrity led and 'right on'. Will we headline the first night and sing for the audience? I am joking.

    Thanks.

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  7. had a look at the CAMRA site, there's a few local pubs with their blessing. And a few micro-breweries, notably the Bitter End in Cockermouth, where there's a glass wall to the bar so you can see the brewing, complete with lady brewer. As you say, not everybody wants to drink Guinness or Smithwicks or Fosters.

    Dunno about singing, but I think I could crack a few jokes.

    Another lovely day, almost feels like spring.
    Raggy cat gone out already, it's spending a lot of time outside, just coming in early for milk and biccies.

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  8. You can't beat real ale Cumbrian. I do not like Smithwicks at all. Never understood why there aren't English pubs in Ireland. There's enough 'Oirish' one's around the world isn't there? English (OK British) regional dishes and real ale should be championed.

    A Farm Aid festival would be great. Perhaps we could have a 'Speakers Corner' for people like me to rant about the lack of public transport in rural areas. May be not!

    Frosty morning but a lovely day. The rain will surely follow the frost.

    Thanks.

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