Monday, 2 September 2013

Pictures From Warsaw Zoo. A Break From The Smallholding.


A crafty Tiger peering through the Elderberries.

 Elephant eating freshly strimmed grass, courtesy of the zoo keepers.
Mummy and baby Rhino tucking in. 
Bison scoffing contently.  Made me think of my cattle back in little old Ireland.

These are pictures of our trip to Warsaw.  The admission charge was 15 Zloty each.  Which is about 3 Euros and fifty nine cents each.  That's fourteen thirty six Euros for a family of four or eleven Pounds and eighty four pence in good old Sterling.   It was an unbelievably inexpensive trip to the zoo.

I don't know what you think about zoos?  I commented to my son how zoo animals are confined to live in the same place all their lives.  Yet they are well fed and have no danger of being killed by other animals.  Number one son pointed out that our cattle have to graze behind electric fences and the field boundaries are fenced with barbed wire.  I think he's got a point.  What do you think?




8 comments:

  1. Love to see a zoo, my favourite's Amsterdam (Artis), big enough to have plenty there, but not too big that you can't see it all in a day.
    Ideal for the wheelchair as well.
    Cost is a lot more than Warsaw, about 15 Euros adult and 12 for a child, so not such a cheap day out for a family of 4.

    It's got an amazing selection of animals, some I've never heard of before, some different sorts of tortoise from 3" long to 4' long, big enough for children to stand on and get their pic taken. Aviary with free-flying birds. Aquarium with weird fish, insect house with dangerous-looking insects. Elephants, giraffes, big cats and buffalo, but no rhinos.
    They had a polar bear that was stir crazy but it's gone now, its enclosure is populated by monkeys with rainbow-coloured backsides.

    A difficult argument for and against zoos. It's nice to be able to see such an assortment of different wildlife from all over the world in one place, interesting and educational. And the captive animals are usually well fed and cared for. Some would argue that it's un-natural keeping nomadic predatory animals in confined enclosures, and I've got to admit that's true, but they get fed appropriate food on a regular basis so not dependent on natural cycles surplus and shortage.
    It probably depends on the animals, I'm sure most of them are quite happy with their safe pampered environment.

    Weather back to normal here, dull, damp, breezy and getting noticeably colder.

    Raggy cat continues in its strange behaviour pattern, spending all its time on the table outside, except asks to come in twice a day for food and milk then back out right away.

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  2. I went to a small town calledPilsen In the Czech Republic and paid pennies to stand in the back of a Threatre to watch a wonderful production of La Traviata

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  3. Thanks for that Cumbrian. Amsterdam zoo sounds like it is one of the best in Europe.

    Think you have got your finger on the pulse with the for and against zoos argument. I like safari parks with lots of pasture for the wild animals to graze and exercise. City farms are another great idea for town and city people to see farm animals.

    It's like an Indian summer here. Our silage is currently being harvested and it looks like a very good crop. Soon be winter.

    Thanks!

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  4. Yes John travel broadens the mind and you see how much cheaper Eastern European countries are to stay in compared to Western Europe. Think you would need to learn to speak their language if you wanted to buy a cheap smallholding there. I also don't fancy their winters. Minus 30 degrees is common in Warsaw.

    Thanks!

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  5. Yes John travel broadens the mind and you see how much cheaper Eastern European countries are to stay in compared to Western Europe. Think you would need to learn to speak their language if you wanted to buy a cheap smallholding there. I also don't fancy their winters. Minus 30 degrees is common in Warsaw.

    Thanks!

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  6. Dunno about being the best, but it's supposed to be one of the oldest in Europe. It's surrounded by streets and buildings now, but I was told when it was established it was on the outskirts. I know it's well kept and all the animals seem happy enough in their environments. And wheelchair access is very good, like most of The Netherlands it's flat and level.

    I like the idea of city farms, never seen one, but the concept is brilliant. I wonder how many city born kids just never see any farm animals, so these places will give them an idea as to where their meat and milk comes from.
    Once visited an open "hands-on" farm in Kent I think it was, my daughter at that time was about 7 and loved it, they let the kids feed suckling calves from buckets and watch at milking time, something a lot of kids (most probably) never get the chance to experience.

    Even rural born kids I don't think will see as much as previous generations, an army of youngsters did the tattie-picking for pocket money, and even allowed to "help" at hay-time, riding on top of the bales, those days seem to have gone for ever with all the huge machines plus H & S rules.
    There were 3 butchers in my village, one each pork, lamb (or mutton) and beef. They killed and butched in the back yard, and it was no problem to watch them at work, never saw the beef guy, but the other two didn't seem to mind kids watching them at work. I shudder to think what the modern H & S men would make of that.

    Dull, cool and breezy again today, no Indian summer.

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  7. It's good to read that Amsterdam zoo is wheelchair friendly Cumbrian. It's about time places open to the public had to be pram and wheelchair friendly. Seaside resorts seem to be very poor at making their beaches accessible for people with walking difficulties. Beaches are awarded and penalized for the cleanliness . Why can't they do the same for pedestrian accessibility? I would also include prams and push chairs.

    Yes city farms are great. Most people have ancestors who originally farmed the land and moved to the towns due to the Industrial Revolution. It's time the tide was turned and people were taught how to tend allotments, farm and learn rural crafts. We seem to place far too much on academic study and not enough on practical skills. We seem to be a post-industrial and consumer led society these days.

    Your rural tales from your childhood sound idyllic. I always smile when I see television pictures of people in the Third World riding on the roofs of trains and buses. They don't seem to worry about Health and Safety, do they?

    Another beautiful day today. Silage bales harvested and ready for winter.

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  8. It's good to read that Amsterdam zoo is wheelchair friendly Cumbrian. It's about time places open to the public had to be pram and wheelchair friendly. Seaside resorts seem to be very poor at making their beaches accessible for people with walking difficulties. Beaches are awarded and penalized for the cleanliness . Why can't they do the same for pedestrian accessibility? I would also include prams and push chairs.

    Yes city farms are great. Most people have ancestors who originally farmed the land and moved to the towns due to the Industrial Revolution. It's time the tide was turned and people were taught how to tend allotments, farm and learn rural crafts. We seem to place far too much on academic study and not enough on practical skills. We seem to be a post-industrial and consumer led society these days.

    Your rural tales from your childhood sound idyllic. I always smile when I see television pictures of people in the Third World riding on the roofs of trains and buses. They don't seem to worry about Health and Safety, do they?

    Another beautiful day today. Silage bales harvested and ready for winter.

    ReplyDelete