Sunday, 22 December 2013

Pictures At My Smallholding Tractor Exhibition.



I seem to be collecting prints of old tractors these days.  There are pictures of Fergusons and Fordsons.  People like myself have a few REAL tractors on the smallholding.  They all remind of us of by gone farming times.  

Here on our smallholding.  We love to watch television shows like "All Creatures Great And Small" and "Wartime Farm".  Thought last weeks Christmas special was quite magical.  Especially the Christmas Carol service.   It was quite moving to think that people were missing their loved ones serving overseas.  

A lot of people will be missing loved ones through bereavement this year.  This will be our first Christmas with out my parents.  It can be a very sad and numb like loss feeling for so many.  I hope there is a better place for all our loved ones.  

Many thanks for reading this blog over the last year.  Special thanks for those who make comments.  I wish you all a very peaceful Christmas and I hope you have a very prosperous year on your allotments, kitchen gardens and smallholdings.


10 comments:

  1. Hope you have a good Christmas, I've enjoyed your blog and sorry I don't comment more!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hope you also have a great Christmas, Kev. I like reading your blog. Don't think I could live anywhere without a vegetable plot and some livestock or ten. Thanks for your comment.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice collection of prints, we have cross-stitch pictures, made by Mrs and framed by me, some really good ones but no tractors, Mrs tends to go for flowers, animals and garden scenes. Maybe I should try and find some tractor pics for her to do.

    Yes, Christmas is often a time of mixed emotions, goodwill to all men but tempered with memories of the ones no longer with us to share it.

    TV today seems to be a collection of repeats from several years after a few carol services this morning.

    Weather blue sky, bright and sunny with a cool breeze, better than the recent storms and torrential rain of the last week.

    Raggy cat developed a distinct preference for indoors during the day, but out all night. Also developed a pot-bellied shape, must be feeding it too much.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Happy Christmas, Cumbrian. I have always been a collector. Copper kettles and horse brasses, books, and now farm machinery and prints of yester year.

    Christmas leaves us with a profound sense of loss for loved ones and to be grateful for what we have and to keep looking to the future. Life is so short and we have to make the most of it.

    Watched 'Whiskey Galore' on BB3 or 4?, the other night.

    "They all lived unhappily ever after".

    Fantastic end of film quote. The Ealing films were absolute classics. Also watched The Beverly Hillbillies (1993?), a modern film version of a classic series. That was also quite brilliant.

    Had some terrible lightning storms last week. Never heard noise like it. Sounded like world war one mortars.

    Cattle seem to be happy in their new shed. So much easier now we no longer have loose housing. They seem to like the rubber mats too.

    Thanks for your comment.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes, the thunder we had was terrible, I've never heard any like it either, couldn't really describe the sound, just different to any I've heard before.

    The cattle should be happy, a nice warm environment with comfortable rubber mats and plenty to eat, life of Riley they have and hopefully some excellent beef at the end. Easier for you as well, sounds like a good system.

    Today marks the start of "our biggest and best sale ever" in various stores, no doubt the tills will be jangling merrily and the owners happy as people dash to max out their credit cards. I won't be joining in.
    The season of peace on earth and goodwill to all men seems to have been taken over by an orgy of advertising, commercialism and consumerism.

    Not a bad morning here, dull, stiff cool breeze and damp but not actually raining.

    Raggy cat in early and asleep on bed, it's getting a treat of chicken bits later.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We had no electricity at 3 this morning. Thought I would be going to a stream and getting cattle water this morning. Electric thankfully restored. Even the well pump needs electricity. Could do with a hand pump. or a Lister engine to pump it. Walked around Haggard lookinjg for any storm damage. Just a 3 foot high wall and concrete foundation completely blown over. Wind had nowhere to escape. Should have left a gap in between top course and shed sheeting. Will spend next dry day cleaning blocks with lump hammer and bolster chisel. Nobody hurt that's the main thing. No doubt lots of fence posts to repair.

    The cattle do seem happy with their rubber mats. Tractor does most of the work bringing in a round bale. I just pike it and scrape the mats with a spade every few days or so.

    We are going to 'Penneys' (Primark) in January for our Christmas presents. I don't care about fashion. Cheap jeans, T shirts..., for next to nothing.

    Saw one advert for beds. Offering free credit for over 150 pounds. If you can't get that together, there's something wrong.

    Hope you are OK after the storms? England and Wales seems to be really suffering. Roll on Spring time.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yes, our electric went off last night late on. Again, it's been off a lot this last week but only for short spells.

    Terrible gales this morning, the wind-mills have stopped turning, a design feature that shuts them down when it gets too rough for them, I've only seen it once before in 20 years, so must be really strong.
    Lots of wheelie bins blowing about and a main road closed, don't know what for, must be some damage or danger. My compost bin' blown over, not bothering to pick it up until it quietens down a bit. Bit of fascia blown off the garage as well, I'll need to stick it back on when it gets a bit drier.

    Yorkshire boarding seems to be the favoured side wall above the blockwork for the cattle sheds here, they don't seem to suffer the same damage in bad weather.

    Raggy cat seems totally unperturbed by the weather, in as usual and sleeping in front of fire.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Never knew it was called Yorkshire boarding - thanks! You often see green fabric 'Gale Break', which seems to work well. It's great for protecting a new hedge from wind burn. We over hung the sheeting in the cowshed with a 2 foot overhang allowing the wind to get in an out from two sides of the building. The newly demolished wall was on the tractor shed. I see why single block walls aren't a good idea. Also thought of leaving gaps in between blocks to allow air/wind to circulate. I have seen wheelie bin parks made with see through blocks to prevent them blowing away and looking unsightly.

    I didn't know the wind mills had the design feature to shut them down. Still think we should be researching fore into wave and sea wind farms. Every river should have a water wheel/hydro plant. Bantry used to run it's town street lights from a waterwheel from an old wooden waterwheel for nothing. Then they decided to join the national grid and pay for it. So much for progress.

    Power cuts make you realize (remember the early seventies) how much we depend on electricity. We are mortgaged to the power companies.

    Thanks for theYorkshire boarding advice.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Yes, as well as river-powered water-wheels, wave and tide power deserves a lot more research / investigation. Saw a programme a while ago and they're experimenting with floating arrangements utilising the swell and movement to generate electric. God knows how many billion tons of salt water constantly moving with wind and tides, I wouldn't have thought it was beyond the ingenuity of man to harness all this free power somehow.

    Wind power's OK I suppose, but intermittent and unpredictable. I read somewhere that it takes more power to manufacture, transport, build and maintain these monsters than they'll ever generate. Rightly or wrongly.

    Yes I remember the miners strike well, all the pubs had Tilley lamps going, it didn't matter because the beer was dispensed by hand-pulled pumps. But you're right, we're too dependent on electric, even gas-fired central heating relies on an electric pump.

    Dry here today, wind's dropped but still a bit blowy.

    Raggy cat been out most of the day, must have pressing business to attend to.

    ReplyDelete
  10. We are completely surrounded by water. Yet we seem to spend so little money on research in how to harness it for power and water. In Saudi Arabia they have giant -desalination plants to make the salt water into drinking water.

    Will we be seeing hose pipe bans and dried up reservoirs next summer time? All the winter rain water could be used far more efficiently. I wonder how much is spent on new and replacing old infrastructure these days?

    Never realized that all the pubs would still have been using hand pumps. Wonder why it changed to electric and gassy lager?

    Domino keeps going to the Kale field. I think he's after a pheasant for his supper. I believe even the pheasants are not native and they were another part of the Empire collection along with snooker, Mulligatawny soup and IPA. Didn't we export that?
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete