Sunday, 23 August 2015

A Mixed Week On The Smallholding.

It's been a mixed week here on the smallholding here in West Cork.  The weather's been a let down like the summer and a calf died, sadly.  

I think April was spectacular, a few days in June to make square bales of hay and a odd few days here and there.  Make up the summer.  

Here's a few pictures of what we and Domino have been up to the last week.

 Some times the sun shines (for 5 minutes) and Domino makes the dry stone wall into a sun lounger.


 The plants nursery.  We have split perennials and rooted over two hundred cuttings.  I will sell them and make some more next year.  Dogwoods are dead easy to root.  Just get your secateurs and make yourself twenty, fifty or an hundred cuttings.  Take the leaves off them and plant the plant like pencils in the ground.  Come next spring they will be sprouting leaves and they will be ready for potting on.

Lots and lots of onions harvested and drying in the poly-tunnel.  "Any body want some onion soup?"  We sometimes have a mad fit and peel a load of them then chop them up ("where's the gas mask?") and place them in plastic freezer bags or a carrier bag and throw them in the freezer.  
 Intensive car unit in the poly-tunnel.  These are fragile perennials and root cuttings.  We have also got some some Rugosa rose hips seeds sprouting in trays.  I read that you are supposed to freeze the seeds to make them germinate.  Ours are sprouting already.  



16 comments:

  1. Sorry to hear about the calf Dave, the financial loss must be hard to take as well as the loss of it. Dogwood sounds as easy to propagate as willow my man, something which I an considering with my young willow hedge.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi John. I hate death full stop. It's such horrible unfinished business. To make it worse it was my eldest son's. I wish it had been one of mine. There's an old farm saying:

    "Where there is livestock. There's dead-stock. "

    Slit treches are said to be easist way of propagating hedging John. Usually in Autumn when the trees and shrubs are dormant. Just dig out a little trench. Place some sand in the bottom and place your twigs in the trench leaving just a couple of inches sticking out. I have done it with Fuchsia successfully. Willow love water and root really easy. My dogwoods will pay for a trip somewhere next year. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bad luck about the calf Dave.
    Weather - wise it sounds as if we have done better than you because on Friday it was very warm. Had the window down for most of the journey to Birr and on the way back I was hot even in my shirt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Heron. Today's been good. All last week was very mixed with rain and a few sunny spells. we were really lucky when we made small square bales of hay in June. Thanks!

      Delete
  4. Yes, Dave, it is sad about the calf dying, and it is an economic loss too. I feel for you and your sons. I hope this week is a better week for you. Rooney needs a bit of help up front too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rachel. Farming is said to be one of the most depressing occupations there is. Don't need to tell you that. You come from a farming family.

      LVG looks like he's found a Dutch masterpiece in Memphis. I think United badly need Young back. Bale will make a good strike partner for Rooney and Ronaldo and Messi can come on if we need them. I can dream can't I? When's Mr Wenger going to splash the cash Rachel? Thanks!

      Delete
  5. Sorry about your calf, Dave, it always bites deep in the heart when things like that happen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vera. It makes you want to pack the smallholding game in when something dies. Hope you are all OK and the house renovations are nearly finished. Thanks!

      Delete
    2. We are doing better now the house is tidier and less full of muddle and chaos......as for animals dying, it is always dispiriting.

      Delete
    3. It's good to see the light at end of the tunnel isn't it Vera. We built our house and we said never again.

      Animals dying always depress me. It seems such a waste of a young life. That's farming isn't it? Thanks.

      Delete
  6. Sad news about the calf Dave, it must be very sad and a huge let down. Your plants are looking good though and hopefully you'll have plenty to sell next year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kirsty. We never seem to deal with death on the smallholding. It is a massive let down and seems such a cruel waste of life. But nature is cruel and kind.

      Yes the plants are looking good. We made use of the wet summer by making new plants. Thanks!

      Delete
  7. Sorry to hear about the calf Dave. Until today the weather has been for the past ten days, and now the heavens have opened, just hoping it stops tonight as we have a trip out planned for tomorrow,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Anne. Thanks. Hope you have a good trip and look forward to reading about it on your blog.

      Delete