Sunday, 4 October 2015

"A Chimney For Every Month, A Door For Every Week, A Window For Every Day Of The Year."


I thought I would show you a really impressive ruin in West Cork.  It's called Coppingers Court.  It was built in the early 17th century by Sir Walter Coppinger.  He was said to be a money lender and he gained considerable estates by mortgage.  He is remembered as someone who lorded over the district and he hanged anybody who disagreed with him from a gallows on the gable end of the court.  


Coppingers Court had two silver gates.  They were thrown into a small lake in Glandore.  In the same year that it was ransacked in 1641 and partly burned down.  It's been derelict since.  This is near Roscarberry and Glandore.  Not far from Drombeg stone circle.  Carol Vorderman used to have an holiday home near here..

It was so impressive a building.  That it had a chinmney for every month, a door for every week and a window for every dasy.  We took the photographs from the lane next to the field.  We were told the landowners didn't really like people trespassing on their property.  So we took these pictures from a distance.









12 comments:

  1. I love old ruins and finding out about the history of them.

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    1. Hi Anne. Ireland is full of ruins. Especially old farm buildings. There are also miles of abandoned railways. Such a shame. Thanks!

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  2. It was probably ancient members your family who took part in it's destruction.

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    1. I am Anglo-Irish and my family is of mixed religion. I don't know if they supported the Royalists way back then Heron.

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  3. Its always fascinating the stories behind these ruins, I suppose the landowner would have to put in place loads of health and safety if he was to allow the public access :-)

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    1. Your are most likely right Dawn. Also public liabilty insurance must be a fortune on ruins. I wish somebody would help private landowners preserve these buildings for future generations to enjoy.

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  4. It's such a shame to see these old buildings in ruins. Shame you couldn't go through the gate and have a good look Dave. :-)

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  5. I totally agree with you Deb. Why can't these old buildings be preserved for future generations to see living history from way back when? You can Google it Deb if you want to see more images and read about this fascinating building. Thanks!

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  6. Looks like it was a magnificent building, but he sounds like a bastard. I notice that the present owner poisons the grass beneath his fencing.... probably best to keep well away, he probably owns a shotgun too.

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  7. Hi Cro. There are lots of magnificent Irish buildings/ruins in need of preservation. There also lots of humble farm buildings that could be redeveloped into rural homes. I don't like weedkiller either. Horrible stuff. Thanks!

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  8. I am a 'new' reader from across the pond...am of Irish descent on my mother's side. Her maiden name was Claypool and her mother's maiden name was Kelly. Hope to see Ireland someday but for now will settle for your blogs to fill my soul! Thanks!

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    1. Hi LDR. You should visit Ireland some time. It's a very beautiful country. Thanks for your comment.

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