Wednesday, 11 November 2015

The Sad Old Blacksmiths Forge And Waiting For the Storm In Dunmanus Bay.


We went round the road around the hill to Durrus this morning.  We stopped on the way outside the old blacksmiths forge. This is no longer in use.  Such a shame. 

 I think buildings have human like faces.  This one looks sad and lonely.  If it's walls could speak.  



Storm clouds gathering over Dunmanus Bay.  The West of Ireland is supposed to be getting another crack of the whip/tailend of Abigail tonight.  You never get use to the Atlantic gales.  It's gale season here from November to March.

10 comments:

  1. I agree with you, I think buildings have a energy and personality absolutely. Maybe someone will bring this one back to a happier state at some point :O)

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  2. Hi Texan. Yes buildings do have energy and personality don't they? We decided to buy an house once after only being in it 5 minutes. It felt just right.

    It would be great to see the building be used again for fixing things or a dwelling for one, may be? Thanks!

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  3. I can tell from reading your blog Dave that you have a 'sense of place'. When I talk about this not everyone grasps what I mean. The building is not specially attractive but it was once busy with a skilled craftsman whose livelihood depended on it. It does look forlorn. Worth stopping to have a look.

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  4. Good expression a 'sense of place' Philip. We tend to pick up on these places of work and home. There is so much for us to see. If we stop and look. Thanks for your thoughts. I suppose writing blogs is an art form in its own way like poetry, music, photography, sculpture and painting?

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  5. Its such a shame when these buildings are left to become derelict, there are so many uses for them and with a housing shortage I cant understand why they are not put to use

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    1. It is a shame Dawn. I have seen lots of derelict rural buildings in Ireland and Portugal. There are no incentives to redevelop these buildings or sites. The sad thing is the countryside seems to be eerily quiet in the daytime apart from slurry and silage and tillage being harvested. We seem to import everything these and manufacture or even repair so little. So much of the countryside is dormitory housing and holiday homes. Thanks!

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  6. I love old buildings like this and even though it is totally utility and has as asbestos cement corrugated roof most probably it represented, as Philip says, a livelihood and a work place for someone who depended on it at some point. These buildings speak volumes about life and are so often ignored.

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    1. Hi Rachel. I have seen some old forge buildings with plaques saying what they were once used for. I love corrugated (tin) roofs. Especially when they get their rusty patina. Would love to know how many empty and derelict buildings there are. It's sad when buildings close and no longer have a use.

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  7. "You never get use to the Atlantic gales. It's gale season here from November to March." Oh wow, now that is one hell of a long season of wintry weather, and reminds me of the time when I lived on the north coast of Kent in a house just metres away from the sea. When those gales hit, and there were quite a few during the winter, the rain used to come off the sea horizontally, driven by a wind that could chill to the bone. At such times walking the dog was not a job to be enjoyed, although there were lots of good moments when the weather was behaving itself.

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  8. Hi Vera. We do get some nice days during the winter. I once visited a pub in Robin Hoods Bay in Yorkshire that sounded like your house in Kent. The waves hit the windows.

    Horrible wet and windy here at the moment. Best thing we ever did putting in a slatted tank in the cowshed. Thanks Vera.

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