Thursday, 21 May 2015

The Girls On Their Grazing Holiday Next To The Sea.


I haven't  shown you any pictures of the girls for a while.  They are just over 12 months and they should be fit for bulling when they are sixteen month old.  I will probably sell them soon and replace them with some dropped calves.  Our work rearing them is done and it's nearly time for them to become milking cows.  The ever turning circle of life on the smallholding.


 Queuing up for a cow brew.  You can see Bantry bay in the background.
 The grass is getting well in front of the cattle.  We have topped one of the fields this week.  Then the water pump died on the tractor.  Luckily we have an apprentice plant mechanic to fix it for us for a few cans of cider.  We are hoping for a big crop of hay and hopefully sell some.  Anybody else planning on making small square bales of hay?
 'Wellies' the heifer posing for a photograph.  She's called 'Wellies' because she's got four white legs that resemble wellington boots.
I made this Heath Robinson adaption with a bath and a pipe from an underground stream.  We also have piped water in the other fields.  This comes from the well on the farm about quarter of a mile away.  It's amazing what gravity can do.  

10 comments:

  1. Don't you love the simple things? Gravity can't go wrong, unlike water pumps.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cumbrian. Water always finds it's way doesn't it? I clean the bath out every month or so. You always get some mud or the girls leave some country pancakes in it for me. Thanks!

      Delete
  2. cool bit of Womble-ing with the bath. I have picked through all the stuff the builder has taken out of the garage and have saved some stuff for a future (next month I hope), project.

    What about pigs Dave. They are my favourites, some lovely sows? I love their little faces.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sol. Don't throw stuff away until you have finished your house renovations. Builders skips often have useful materials in them. I have been known to cadge wood for firewood and baths for water for the cattle and for growing veg in.

      We always get two piglets in the Autumn and fatten them inside their slatted shed. Why don't get a pot belly or a micro pig for pets Sol?

      Delete
  3. I'll make hay but as I have no storage it'll have to be round bales to take a bit of rain.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Haylage is it Kev? The sheep will love that won't they? Depending on the weather. We will may small square bales of hay. Keeping a lot of it inside for us and hopefully we will sell some to other farmers and horse owners. It costs a fortune making round bales of silage. But if we get a wet summer that's what we will have to do? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Haylage is it Kev? The sheep will love that won't they? Depending on the weather. We will may small square bales of hay. Keeping a lot of it inside for us and hopefully we will sell some to other farmers and horse owners. It costs a fortune making round bales of silage. But if we get a wet summer that's what we will have to do? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Haylage is it Kev? The sheep will love that won't they? Depending on the weather. We will may small square bales of hay. Keeping a lot of it inside for us and hopefully we will sell some to other farmers and horse owners. It costs a fortune making round bales of silage. But if we get a wet summer that's what we will have to do? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Interesting that you pay the Apprentice Plant Mechanic with Cider. Considering that you are an outspoken advocate for creating more rural jobs........ ??

    ReplyDelete
  8. Number one son is more than happy with a few cans of cider for fixing our tractor Heron. He's one of the lucky one's with a job and a paid wage. I was just saying that at least we don't have to pay labour charges for fixing our machinery when it breaks. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete