Sunday, 20 September 2015

More Knitting Tales! A Aran Cardigan Made On The Smallholding.


Here is some more of the wife's knitting to look at.  Apparently it's an Aran cardigan.  These originate from the Aran Isles off Galway.  A lot of patterns were distinctive family patterns.  Not just for decoration.  It was surmised that they were used to identify missing fishermen when their boats had been lost at sea and drowned.  Some folk do not agree with this theory.  I think the Clancy Brothers, Grace Kelly, Steve McQueen and Val Doonican made the Aran jumpers so famous.

Here are the back and front of a cardigan my wife knitted 2 years ago.  Sadly it won't fit number 2 son any more.  I wonder if it will fit the terrier?





Can't think of any knitting jokes.  Apart from the old one about the horse that swallowed a ball of wool.  It turned into a fine jumper.


17 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. haha that joke was actually quite good! (i should know, my hubby is the master of cheesy jokes!)
    That cardigan is beautiful! Your wife is incredibly talented :)
    I love the theory on family patterns to identify sailors, much more intriguing

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  3. Hi MEOD. Will pass on your kind words to my wife. I agree fishermen patterns is much more intriguing. They also knitted socks like you do. Thanks!

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  4. I love aran, and that cardi is very pretty. Whenever I knit something I also do an aran design on whatever it is I am knitting. PS. Thought the joke was funny!

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  5. Hi Vera. I am you like the cardi. Don't encourage me with my jokes. I get told:

    "It was good the first time I heard it."

    Here's a music themed joke for your delight:

    How do you know when there is a folk singer at your front door?

    He can never find the right key and doesn't know when to come in!

    Throwing it down here in Ireland. Thanks Vera.

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  6. Well hello! I'm new here- blog hopping over from Sue in Suffolk! That's a really unusual pattern, one I've never seen before. U.S. It from a pattern or is it just one your wife does from memory? :-)

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    1. Hello Rrs. It's from a pattern book of Aran wool. Thanks.

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  7. Wonderful, :O), I can only imagine how hard that must have been to knit! Lots of nice detail in it! Great story on how the patterns originated. I take you all call sweaters/cardigans "jumpers"?

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  8. Hi Texan. The cardigan took about 3 months to knit on an off. I am told it wasn't difficult. She just followed a pattern and was pleased with the results. I also like the story behind things. I think jumpers are pullovers that go over your head and cardigans are joined up the middle by buttons or zips. Thanks!

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  9. It look great Dave, I'm still trying to find a pattern to knit for the OH. Where did your wife get hers from? I have managed to track down proper Aran wool though.

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  10. Hi Anne. It's a Sirdar knitting pattern. They are on the Internet. There are also quite a few free Aran knitting patterns on the Internet. I am told to tell you that any good wool shop will have knitting patterns. Good luck. Look forward to seeing your knitting on your blog Anne!

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    1. Any good wool shop Dave? You must think we still live in the UK, there's one shop in our nearest big town that sells wool but no patterns or needles, Simon had to make me needles last year so I could knit hats for friends Christmas presents. I have tracked down a small cottage industry in Co. Sligo that sells both wool and patterns so next week we will pay a visit, around 130k round trip to buy wool!

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    2. You sound like me Anne when I want a pork pie and have to travel to Cork or Killarney. We even make them now.

      Great ideas for friends Christmas presents. We usually send calendars with pictures of Ireland.

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  11. A great yarn Dave ! Pardon the pun :)

    The truth is that the knitting jumpers - oh sorry I mean Aran Sweaters!
    Was only introduced in the 1890's and knitting was encouraged on the islands by the Congested Districts Board. This body had been established to encourage economic growth in rural areas where the population had outgrown the productive capacity of the land. Prior to that the women only knitted socks for the menfolk.
    Once the island women started knitting, there was no stopping them! It was a communal activity, a pastime that brought together the girls and women who shared their skills and, in time, the symbolic stitch designs they developed.

    for more information see
    http://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit.com/aran-sweaters.html#sthash.1GOWPVCw.dpuf

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    1. Thanks for that Heron. I think it's nice to add a bit of poetic licence to a topic. I have even read that Guinness is said to have been first brewed in London and Snooker was invented during a monsoon season in India. Thanks!

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  12. Lovely! Worth listening to the clicking sound, I think! But then I am a TV knitter myself, so am biased! I do love Aran knitting.

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  13. Thanks Jayne. The only clicking I make is with the tv remote control. Thanks for your comment Jayne.

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