Tuesday, 3 July 2018

King Dock.


Hello and welcome from the World Weed Growing Championships in Pernicious town.

But seriously folks.  I was weeding a backyard/garden for a customer the other week and I spotted this specimen growing through the rubble of where an old shed use to be.  So I gently gave it a yank and a pull and I found the biggest Dock plant in Christendom.  What a specimen.  

Remember when they start televising the World Weed Growing Championships.  You heard of it here first!  

17 comments:

  1. Har' har ' ha'
    That's no weed it is a nettle sting fixer !

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  2. "Get you nettle sting fixers". Good idea Heron. Wonder if I could sell them?

    I keep getting bit by doctor fly's at the moment. Three yesterday and six while out walking last week. My eldest recommends covering yourself in Lynx deodorant spray. Apparently they don't like it. Thanks Heron.

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    Replies
    1. Please tell me what is a Doctor Fly ?

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    2. Perhaps its a West Cork term for a Horse Fly. They silently land on you and inject their poison into your skin. Then it stings like hell. Its the female that bites you.

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    3. OK yes I have been stung by one of them on the back of my leg it took awhile to heal too.
      Doctor Flies are found in South America and Florida and look a bit like a Dung fly.

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    4. Warble flies are another nasty insect that attack livestock in long grass. I believe we also get Mosquitoes in Ireland. We always have Anthisan cream and Piriton antihistamine tablets in. Thanks!

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  3. That's a monster. You're lucky it came out so easily.

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  4. A Leviathian of a Dock plant Linda. They can be difficult to pull out and part of their taproot breaks off. Still Scorchio here. Thanks!

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  5. That's one monster of a dock root! Docks grow ever so well here, and we have had the best year yet what with all the rain we have had recently! So all I do is scythe them down, thinking that if I do that the root will become eventually weakened. But after a recent inspection of the veg plots it looks like that theory needs to be reviewed!

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  6. Hi Vera. It is a corker of a dock root. Cow manure and slurry is full of dock seeds. Its a cold manure and the seeds survive. I have read that docks collect nutrients in their taproots and are a good addition to the compost heap after they have decomposed. Hope your getting some sunshine. Thanks.

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  7. It's a new sport. A bit like fishing. You have to weigh and measure it before you throw it back in or have it framed on the taproom wall.

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  8. Sounds like a great new sport that will catch on like internatinal tiddly winks, welly throwing and bog snorkelling Gwil. You could have your specimen weed framed and hung in your tap root room even! Thanks.

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  9. Hmmm! As far as I know I haven't any nettles. There must be a dock lying around somewhere.

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  10. Hi Valerie. I get lots of nettles in our gardens. They attract butterflies and the old gardening saying "Where nettles grow, anything will grow". Docks have their uses too. Easpecially for nettle stings. Thanks.

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  11. And I thought the weeds in our back garden were bad! I've been trying to get rid of the nettles, but it's a battle I'm not winning.

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  12. Hi LL Cool Joe. Yes the dock is massive. I don't mind nettles apart from their sting. If you cut them down with hand shears and wear oves. They won't become a nuisance. Its when you let them go to seed. Thanks

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