Monday, 17 December 2012

A Topical Allotment Song. ("Oh it's p*ssing it down.")

There is still no chance of me doing any kind of cultivation nay earth works on my smallholding vegetable plot at the moment.  It's times like this when I often hear myself singing  one of my son's compositions. Pray let me explain dear readers.

A few years a go when number 2 son was about 4 years old.  I once left number 1 son and number 2 son sit and wait on the supermarket bench while I went for some of my 'medicine' in the OFF LICENCE department.  I came back a few minutes later and number 2 son was singing at the the top of his voice:

"Oh it's pissing it down, it's pissing it down, oh it's pissing it down...."

Repeat for ever and a day.

One old man who looked like a farmer (chewing grass, wearing smock, not really..) thought number 2 son's song was hilarious.  Whilst a few old ladies shook their heads with very sullen expressions.  I just laughed and we made a quick exit out of the supermarket.  I mean I could hardly chastise him could I?  I wouldn't be surprised if I had composed the song myself.

Here's another one of my favourite Christmas songs for you:  Jethro Tull: "Ring Out Solstice Bells."  It's the shortest day this week (21 Dec) and I thought it's topical and a celebration of the old Celtic Winter Solstice.  I have been  lucky enough to see Jethro Tull a few times and they have done some pretty awesome tracks down the years.  'Songs From The Woods' and 'Heavy Horses' are my two favourite albums.  When you listen to the lyrics, you realise what an ecological and environmental thinking band they are.   Enjoy.

10 comments:

  1. Wet here as well, one of those horrible damp days when it's not actually raininmg but damp and light mist, I guess your mizzle sums it up perfectly; grey and cool.
    Sounds like your sons have it summed up to a T, I think I'd have found it amusing hearing them.

    The good thing this week was finding a scource of CO2 bottles, a fire extinguisher chap in Carlisle, got 2 bottles, different size and colour than the grey one I had, but same weight and thread. Work perfectly, even got a handle instead of a tap, so real ale drinking has re-commenced, the additional few weeks in the keg doesn't seem to have affected quality. Now another brew can be put in hand, Woodfordes Norfolf Werry.
    Mrs has decreed that my Christmas box shall be some home brew kits, selected by myself and ordered / paid for by her. Sounds good to me.

    Raggy cat was put out last night and then let in again by Mrs when she came to bed later (she's too sort with it) so I found it this morning in front of fire (not on) and fed it the remnants of yesterdays gammon dinner (Mrs didn't eat all hers) then put it out. It's perched on the decking railing again, it doesn't want to come in, seems to be keeping watch on its back garden territory.
    Can't find my camera (really need to have a tidy up) or I'd take its picture.

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  2. Hi Cumbrian, It's trying to blow a gale here and we had a sleety shower a while ago. Yes it was amusing. Talk about out of the mouths of babes. They say if you want to listen to yourself, listen to your children. Ireland's very mild, but we get far too much rain. Being near the Atlantic Ocean doesn't help.

    Bought myself a bottle of Glenmorangie malt whisky the other day. Is there anything more superior than a Scottish malt?

    Raggy Cat sounds like he's on the hunt for something?

    Thanks.

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  3. A good single malt, if there is anything better I don't think I've tasted it. Sometimes on the ferries they have single malt tasting samples, each one has its own individual aroma and essence, I particularly like the smokey peat flavour some of them have; sadly I never seem to remember their names, they tend to be rare and very expensive.
    Having said all that, some of the better vintage ports can be very nice, same thing, the best are very expensive. A friend (ex friend) brought me a bottle from my year of birth for my 50th, I daren't ask how much it cost, not for everyday consumption, tasted good though.

    Yeah, I thought Raggy cat would be on the look-out for a snack, I haven't had any live presents for a while, presumably all the little edible things are getting hard to find in the cold weather.
    Haven't seen the squirrel again, hope it's OK.

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  4. You're right about a good single malt, Cumbrian. My favourite is Dalwhinnie. Once went there when we visited Culloden. The whisky guide told us the Dalwhinnie is made with the water from millions of years old glacier water then stored for years in oak barrels to mature and to get the taste. I have sampled Irish whiskey but I much prefer the Scottish malts. I bought the Glenmorangie in Tesco for 30 Euros. Normally it's about 44 Euros. I saw an advert on British television the other day and they have got some incredible offers on Scottish malts at the Cooperative Store.

    We also got some 'Aberdeen Angus' beef from a small independent butcher in the Tesco supermarket in Killarney. It was labelled 'Aberdeen Angus' and tasted incredible. Great British malt whisky and a great British breed of meat. What could be finer?

    The port sounds amazing.

    Hope Raggy Cat doesn't decide to hunt the squirrel.

    Thanks.

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  5. What about Ian Anderson's salmon farming, Dave, is it ecologically sound? Only asking as I know nothing about the topic.

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  6. I don't know about Ian Anderson's particular salmon farm/farms. But there is a Norwegian company trying to start another one here in Bantry Bay and people are saying salmon farms cause pollution, spread sea lice and are cruel because the salmon are confined in small ring, net pools.

    I have also read of a Salmon farm in Scotland on land in tanks and it uses hydro electricity. There are so many types of farming which you could ask the same question Pat. Veal farming and battery hens are just 2 examples that come to mind.


    Great question Pat.

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  7. Saw a documentary on Jethro Tull years ago, and Ian Anderson seemed to be hailed as a hero for his salmon farming bringing employment to the locals, Dave.

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  8. I have never heard this ever....
    enjoyed it too!

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  9. Yeah I think I saw the same documentary, Pat. A lot of people don't like salmon farms because they produce cheaper Salmon than the one's caught by the Atlantic estuary fishermen. The traditional fishermen can't compete. Rather like the British and Irish sheep farmers against their New Zealand counterparts. Globalization seems to have an effect on every body's livelihood today. The salmon farms only create a handful of job at the most. But they do help the local economy. Ian Anderson also farms a massive estate in Wiltshire. The lyrics to 'Jack In The Green' are very environmental and prophetic for the end of the oil age.

    Thanks Pat.

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  10. Glad you like it John. It's from about 1977. Think it's off the 'Songs From The Woods' album. They are named Jethro Tull after the man who invented the seed drill. They used to hire a ship to take them and their equipment on their world tours. Think they originate from Blackpool?

    Thanks for your comment.

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