Monday, 27 October 2014

A New Life For A Drawer In The Smallholding "Utility" - "Boot Room".

There was a gap between the dishwasher and the fridge.  The wife decided she wanted a 'thingamajig jig' to keep the washing powder and cleaning stuff and dishwasher tablets on.  We looked in the Argos catalogue and on the T'web and Tinter'net.  But there was nothing the right size or cheap enough.  Call for "number one" son:"Caractus Potts" to come to the rescue.

He went out to the garage and pulled out a drawer from an old 'self assembly' chest of drawers.  You know one of those with more wobble than a jelly and that should have a sticker on it saying "made to break".  He placed some screws in the joints and found some old castors and fixed it to the bottom of the drawer, which was now standing vertical instead of horizontal.

Here's the "washing powder tidy".
Do you like the fridge magnets?



It works brilliant and fits the gap like a glove.  My only suggestion for anybody thinking of making one for themselves.  Don't store cleaning materials or washing powder where children might find them.

The "tidy" cost nothing.  Perhaps he will make us "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, next?  Ian Fleming wrote it you know!  Couldn't imagine Dick Van Dyke playing James Bond.  Could you?

24 comments:

  1. I forgot to say. He made a shelf in the drawer to put "fings" on! Sorry!

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  2. A very innovative and talented young man.

    I wonder how many useful things which could easily be re-purposed are buried in land-fill sites?

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  3. I will pass on your compliment to him, Cumbrian - Thanks!

    Totally agree with you. I love rustic and the hippie chic style of furnishing your home. We seem to have everything made into square boxes and designed by a computer today. Think that's why we like allotment architecture, corrugated iron, rough plaster and old rustic dwellings.

    Watched George Clarkes Amazing Spaces on Channel Four last week. There was this man who made an home for him and his two children out of an old railway carriage. It was brilliant!

    When our ancestors wanted an house they just built it. You and your mates chopped down some trees and quarried stone and everybody helped each other. There were no mortgages, planning or credit cards or somebody designing your factory made fitted kitchen. Land fill is awful and you should be able to salvage stuff for a small price and make your own furniture and fashion.

    Thanks!

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    1. George Clarks program is normally very good, we both loved the railway carriage but could see little point in the private jet conversion, they could not even stand up in it apart from the bathroom.
      We have twice built our own house, our last farm here we built a straw bale house, no plans other than a few sketches to work out measurements. Best house we have ever lived in. Total cost was 10.400 punts including a second hand range, recycled teak double glazed windows.
      Then we moved to Spain and again built from scratch using cut stone that was on our land, most of the windows and doors came from the local tip, cost of that was around 25.000 euros. The only help we had was for an internal wall built from block, neither of us like working with blocks, stone is far more forgiving.

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    2. Yes Anne. We also like George Clarks programmes. His shed of the year series was wonderful. I really liked the railway carriage.

      We went through the building ordeal when we built our house on the farm. We did it without a mortgage. It's not perfect but we love it!

      I follow a blog call Lackan Cottage Farm. Steve and his wife are building a straw bale building at the moment. They live in the North of Ireland. If you want inspiration, read their blog.

      I would love to buy a ruin in Portugal. They were selling clay bricks in the Alarve last year for 12 cents a block. I do like natural materials like stone and wood. Thanks Anne.

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    3. I think we have met Steve at a permaculture gathering locally, the gathering that was held at his place was run by a friend of ours, it is her Mum that can only make a profit from her lambs by selling privately. We know several people that he mentions on his blog, what I cant make out is if he is actually building a straw bale structure or just using it as insulation for the extension, he has certainly done at lot since they bought the place.

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    4. What a small world. There seems to be a great community for smallholders up there. Wish I had friends Steve and the others.

      I think he's built the eco classroom and using straw bales for insulation. He's also gets a lot of help from the WWOOF Ireland.. Have you had any work for you Anne? Did you ever meet the great John Seymour? He lived in Wexford for a time. Thanks!

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    5. Yes , we knew John, he used to stay with friends of ours when he came up to this part of the country he was a great character and loved his pint, I have several of his books which he signed for me.
      We were WWOOF hosts for a number of years but around 2002/03 we found that most of them at that time were not interested in Organics and only wanted a cheap holiday, we now host with HelpX where we can pick and chose far better as they give a full profile of their selves plus references. We are looking for someone at the moment to help make the new raised beds but although we have had over ten apply over the last couple of weeks none of them would be suitable for various reasons.
      We first met Tom Woolly (prof.) at an energy conference way back in the 90's he's a green architect that I believe has worked with Lackan, again a great guy. He also worked on a straw bale build in Leitrim. Leitrim and Sligo counties have a great energy about them and some very interesting people.

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    6. John Seymour is one person I would have loved to met. I have read several of his books and he loved peasant farming and traditional methods.

      It does sound like a place for great energy in Leitrim and Sligo. Wish we lived near like minded people interested in smallholdings and allotments. Thanks Anne.

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  4. Great to recycle and a really clever idea.

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  5. Hi Jane. I totally agree it is great to recycle. Wish we had your talent to paint a picture on them. Thanks for your comment Jane.

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  6. Thanks Irene. We couldn't find anything that fit in the space between the dishwasher and the fridge. So we made our own bespoke "washing powder tidy". Thanks for your comment, Irene.

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  7. I love womble moments. I am saving this idea away in my brain for future reference. Thanks

    I found a curtain rod in the house when we moved in. it is under the sink and all my spray bottles hang in it and it leaves room below for other things. nice and tidy

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  8. Womble moments. What a brilliant expression, Sol. Your curtain rod spray bottle tidy sounds like a good blog post for you. Thanks!

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  9. What a great idea! Your son's very inventive.

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    1. Thanks Deb. He is not very academic but he's got a photographic memory and he is incredibly practical. Thanks again!

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  10. Great Dave, I am pleased your son is following in your footsteps in the good tradition of being inventive. Rachel

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    1. I have the manual dexterity of a three toed sloth ("sorry sloth's") Rachel. He tells me what he is going to do and he could be talking in a foreign language. The only gift he's got from me is to never be beat. Thanks Rachel.

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  11. Now how useful is that for an old rickety drawer. Now how can I convince my other half that this would be a useful item for him to make out of the couple of drawers which are at the this moment residing on the 'to be taken down to the tip' pile!

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  12. Hi Vera,

    You shouldn't throw anything unless you have to on a smallholding, Vera. Even if you only use the drawers for kindling for your Aga. Don't throw them away. Thanks!

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  13. Now that's ingenious - and thanks for reminding me about the Famous Five - it's now on my list for future Nostalgia Alert posts. Cheers from Carole's Chatter

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  14. Only just seen this - that's a great idea - I'm planning something similar for under the stairs.

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  15. Only just seen your comment, Kev. Look forward to reading about your idea for under the stairs! Thanks!

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