Tuesday, 9 June 2015

1970's Hay Making In The Twenty First Century.

"When we were young.  You shone shine like the sun."

The old mental juke box keeps playing a certain Pink Floyd song in my head this week folks.  

"Shine on you crazy diamond".






Number 2 son took these photos from his mum's mobile phone.  They are absolute crackers!   Number one son is hay tedding with the Ford 4600.  She looks like new.  Him and his tractor mechanic friend and a little help from (little old me) restored her back to her former glory.  She's been sandblasted, painted and split in two and put back together again.  Isn't she a beauty? 

Gosh how I love the smell of hay.  Takes me back to the late sixties/early seventies.  When my dad would take his 'wakes' holidays from the mill and go and hay make on his parents farm.  Piking hay by hand and carting it away to be stacked in one big hay stack.   

We don't have an horse and cart but we are making hay like they did in the seventies.  Before the round bales of silage came to town or even the countryside.  Supposed to rain on Saturday.  Lets hope we get our hay bales in the barn before then.  Will post photos of the hay baling!



10 comments:

  1. I wish you hadn't mentioned rain, for we are busy painting the house not been done for five years. So we be busy titivating it up for the 2016 Commemoration - what are you doing ?

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  2. I painted the farmhouse a couple of months a go Heron. Busy today weeding the vegetable plot, mowing, strimming and cutting the hedges. Going tedding the hay this afternoon. Fantastic weather here in West Cork. Thanks!

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  3. Sorry, what I meant was, is what are you doing to celebrate the 2016 Commemoration Dave ?

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  4. I don't know Heron. I know the school children get 3 weeks holiday next Easter. So we might have a week in Portugal again.

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  5. I like the square bales myself but they are getting nearly impossible to find, everyone has gone to the giant rounds. The big round ones are so hard to pull the hay off of. Since I use hay for gardening not feeding animals so much. I put down about a foot on my garden each year as mulch for water retention. Also on all the trees and berries and we roll one big round bale out in the fruit orchard each year for the same reason. Otherwise you can't keep anything watered here.

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  6. Hi Texan. Square bales are labour intensive but I like them. Young cattle and ponies love hay. The big round bales can be moved with a tractor and spike. If it's wrapped like haylage or silage it can be stored outside. It's also cheaper to make small square bales of hay.

    Have you use straw for a mulch? Gravel chippings hold the moisture under the stones. Do you have irrigation systems in your garden. Thanks for your comment!

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  7. Hope you get the bailer in before it rains again, I well remember one year, the bailer had just finished, it was getting dark and the heavens opened, we lost the lot!

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    1. Thanks Anne. The hay baler arrived about six and we had all the bales in the shed by eleven. We went to bed at 12.30 and woke up this morning at 9.40. Very tired and aching all over this morning but very happy and proud of our hay making achievements.

      It's soul destroying when you lose a crop. We lost a field of loose hay once. Thanks!

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  8. What a lovely set of photos..... and I love the smell of hay as well. I also like the sound and feel of the scythe swishing away as it cuts the grass, but I found turning the grass to dry was very hot and tiring work. Now Lester has his tractor the cutting of the grass is now his job, but I am still 'required' to help with the turning and baling up of the hay. It is with some relief that we have decided not to make hay this year, but to use the field as extra pasture.

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    1. Thanks Vera. We are going to get the top picture made into a Christmas card to send to friends and relatìves.

      The sound of the scythe is magical. John Seymour said:

      "When you buy hay you buy land."

      You will save a lot of money if you buy hay direct from the field when it's being baled. Thanks!

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