Wednesday, 3 June 2015

"Testing Testing One Two TB!"



I often think that the perfect fam would be laid out  in one farm parcel.  But of course ours isn't.  We have a few acres around the farm dwellings and another ten acres across the main road next to the bay.  It's often too busy and dangerous to move cattle along the road.  We take them to their summer grazing in the cattle box trailer.

Every twelve months the cattle have to have their annual test for TB.  If they are over 2 years, they get blood tested for Brucellosis.  You also need to blood them if you want to sell them.  I don't think sheep or pigs get tested for TB.  Except when they go the slaughter house and vets take samples.  We have to pay the vet to test the cattle every year.

One of the credentials (requirements) of getting an herd number is that you have a cattle crush for testing for TB.  We have two cattle crushes.  A bought one up at the farm and a home made one down in the fields.  It's great for putting the cattle in for dosing for stomach worms, replacing lost ear tags or treating a sick animal.  You can also test the cattle in it for TB.  We made the field crush out of old scaffolding tubes and corrugated iron sheets and concreted them in.  A welder we know made up the two gates and used his mobile welder to fit them.  The crush cost next to nothing and made life so much easier for us.




 Pictures of a field cattle crush.  The rust is beginning to paint a lovely patina on the steel.  I love corrugated iron.

13 comments:

  1. Looks like a good crush. Good job I don't need them with sheep! The infrastructure with keeping animals is often overlooked when people hear how much one sells for.

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  2. Oh and good luck with the testing!

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  3. Hi Kev. It's strong and does the job. Testing isn't cheap either. The department won't give you a cattle herd number if you don't have a crush to test them. Thanks!

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  4. Looks strong and well built. Hope it does the job well

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    1. Hi BG. Yes we had to concrete it in to stop the cattle from wrecking it. It costs very little and it's great when you need to treat or dose or test the cattle. Thanks!

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  5. looks awesome :) I don't have a wide knowledge of farming, only what I was taught on my uncle's farm when I was younger, and that depended on if my uncle was in a good mood and of I wasn't getting distracted by a new litter of farm kittens lol, but yours looks pretty solid to my inexperienced eyes :)
    good luck on the testing

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    1. Thanks Undomestic Diva. It's got to be strong to hold them. Cattle are incredibly strong and don't like going in the crush. Most of all they don't like vets because they are strangers. We talk and stroke our cattle and they soon get to know and trust that we won't hurt them. They don't like worming injections either. Thanks for your comment!

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  6. Thats a lot of testing. We do not raise any cattle. However I want a milk cow reallllllly bad!

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  7. Hi Texan. You are in the biggest cow county in the world. If you want a milk cow get yourself one. Thanks for following my blog.

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    1. Yep true on cow country, if your after a Beef cow, they are all over the place. Dairy cows are hard to come by here. One you would want that is. But have a lead on a farm raising Belted Galloway!

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    2. Belted Galloway don't need winter housing and can stay out in all weather, They are a nice animal. We have a couple of pot one's in our display cabinet.

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  8. good bit of womble-ing. do they come to the bucket or do you us a hurdle?

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  9. Thanks Sol. They will follow a bucket or they will come to you if shout:

    "Sug, sug, sug."

    You can also walk behind them and they will go you want.

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