Sunday, 7 June 2015

Hay, Hay And Thrice Hay!

The old currant bun (sun) is paying Ireland a visit this weekend.  Three of our fields were mowed last night and today we are using the hay bob and tractor to turn the grass into hay.  Hopefully ("please, please!") we will be making small square bales of hay before the weekend.  

The Corn field (all our fields have names) is a really heavy cut.   The Wester field isn't bad either.  The quarry field (used to have a little quarry in it) was mown for the first time in my living memory last night.  The gate entrance had to be made bigger to let the contractors mower and tractor in.  So I will be busy this week putting up a newer and bigger field gate.  Great stuff.  Not!

Yesterday aftenoon was spent by yours truly strimming edges of the field, ditches and strams to show the mower man where not to cut.  I spent about twenty minutes pulling a water pipe up and placing it in the hedge.  Grass is such a nuisance for wrapping itself and it's roots round things.  I also found the tractor grass roller covered in brambles.  Don't start me on them.  

Are you making hay this year?  Must find somebody to bale the hay for us.  I think the going rate is about fifty cents a bale.  Or Ten bob if you still talk in old money like I do.   

Pictures to follow.


15 comments:

  1. oh that's fascinating. call me an idiot but I didn't know that grass could be turned into hay, I thought it was a special type of plant... * hangs head in shame *

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You made me smile Undomesticated Diva with your comment. If you don't know, you don't know. I once went in Argos bought a digital camera and heard my self say to the cashier:

      "What film does it take."

      She said."

      It doesn't, it's digital!"

      Thanks.

      Delete
    2. hahaha! At least it just me! It has made me look at my grass with a renewed interest! :D

      Delete
    3. I am always learning new things on my smallholding. Thanks!

      Delete
  2. My one field is ready to cut but I have two others that aren't so I'll eait a little longer and try to catch them all together. Like you I have someone come and cut it, turn it myself and then they come back to bale ot. I have no storage here yet so have to round bale it and sell it then by small bales back in the winter. Planning permission was refused for a barn but I'll try again next year
    Hopefully now I have more land ot should be easier to get the permission. I need somewhere to lamb the sheep as well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What about loose hay and make haystacks Kev? We made a massive one a few years a go. It was hard work piking all that loose hay.

      Sheep won't eat silage will they and haylage is prone to rot. I bought small hay bales last year, 3 for 10 Euros. Which is about seven pounds fifty. No contractors to pay and you get it when you need it.

      Hope you find some housing for your livestock Kev.

      Delete
  3. We cut and hand baled (hay into big plastic box, then tied with string) ourselves last year....the previous years I cut the field with a scythe...but it is only a small field!
    But we have no time this year, and anyway, we have nowhere for storage, so we shall have to buy in round bales again. Sometimes I wish we had more fields, sometimes I don't because of the extra work! But it would be nice to feed our own hay to our animals but we can't do everything...this is what we are gradually getting into our heads. Being novice smallholders it is taking a while to recognize our own limitations!

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's a learning process isn't it Vera? I spent my first five years here with just a wheelbarrow and a pike to muck out with. Then I bought a little tractor to help me around the smallholding. A cow eats an awful lot of hay over winter. We just keep calves and sell them or eat one of them when they are adults. Thanks for your comment Vera.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Dave......can you have a break in the uk?
    Meet up for a pint?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi John. I read your blog every day. It's though I know my internet friends even though I have never met them. One day we will have to have a blog convention and sup a few pints of real ale. Superb weather here today! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Someone mention a pint?

    It's about time the Sun came out to play Dave, hope you get your bailing done without hassle.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Is it that time of day already, John. I am spitting feathers for a pint. Going to sit out on the patio later with a couple of pints of Newcastle Brown and watch the bay.

    Supposed to rain on Saturday. Must organize a small bale chappie to visit us. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Dave
    I make hay , on a small scale
    Strim the field
    Make a small haystack
    Fill hen boxes!
    This year i have put some away for the sheep..... But they are so stoic they dont eat it

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi John. Please post a picture of your haystack on your blog. Strimming a field is hard graft. Sheep are very finicky. I love the smell of freshly made hay. Takes me back over forty years when we use to come to Ireland on our holidays and make hay with a horse and cart and pikes. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Looks like you just let it rip there and mowed into those fields, or at least some of it. It's probably quite fulfilling to be done with the quarry field, as well as all those ignored corners. Hopefully that’s the last of it for now. Good day!

    Kristina Cobb @ Denny's Lawn

    ReplyDelete