Friday, 21 November 2014

"Electricity, Electricity, EEEE..."

Woke up this morning.  I should write country and western Songs.  They call it "Country and Irish" over here.  Any way.  I thought I would check the blogs, emails and see how the "Nasty Nigel" (The tory SDP)  party had done in the by election.  The electricity goes off and I begin to curse.

Everything seems to be dependent on electricity on our farm.  The pump from the well.  The pump from the solid fuel range.  The computer and television.  The electric cooker.  The hair dryer. The microwave...?    I have heard years a go that people told the electricity companies that they didn't want electricity because they didn't want a bill. Dairy farmers hand milked cows or they used diesel Lister engines to run their milking machines.

It must have been wonderful years a go with no electricity.  Just a paraffin or oil Tilley lamp or candles and a "nice cup of tea" to look forward to.  Maybe even a game of "monsters in the dark" with the wife if it was your birthday?  Perhaps she could darn some socks and you could chew tobacco and spit in the fire and get told off.  There must have been lots of cabin fever in the days without electricity and television.  You might have even got somebody calling and hoping you would get the beer and whisky out?

Any road the electricity is back on and I am an happy bunny again.  Thanks to electricity and that clever English invention -T'web and t internet.  We have communication with the outside world.  I wish I had my own wind turbine.  Does anybody make their own electricity.  No not the static kind.  I mean proper electricity.

Remember this song from the Eighties?




18 comments:

  1. Oh Dave. thank you for making me laugh on this dreary Friday.
    Hubby thinks that Yule counts as much as a birthday!!!!!! Fun though, enit? And a fab way of keeping warm.

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  2. Glad you find my blog funny, Irene. I think television programmes were the first contraceptive invented by the BBC. One of my heroes Mike Harding said that God gave us belly buttons so that we can peel potatoes (for chips) when we are in bed.

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  3. Yes, we all seem to be too dependent on electricity for just about everything.

    Yet it's within living memory when there it wasn't universal, it's only taken 2 generations to become so completely hooked.

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  4. Every thing we use seems to be powered by electricity Cumbrian. Wonder if we will ever see electric cars replace the petrol and diesel engines?

    A lot of European cities like Vienna, Manchester, Warsaw, Krakow, Sheffield and Bratislava use trams. Think it be great if every town had them and most high streets were pedestrianised. In my opinion there are far too many cars on the roads and not enough public transport. Cars must be one of the biggest pollutants in the world.

    I wouldn't like to live in the countryside with out electricity or the Internet. Today I have electronically communicated with people in England, Ireland and Eastern Europe. Who would of thought of it twenty years a go?

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  5. my friends Brother installs solar panels her mum sells to the grid when at work in the day and all the appliances are low electrical use and she has battery back up. she can draw from the grid if she wants but there are 3 adults living there and other than when they were shut in the house when it was that bad weather in feb 2011 they dont really pay for electric. but when you have a son to look after the set up and install it all it will be the most efficient wont it.

    I did see that you can now buy solar panels that in the shape and size as a roof tile or shingle. we are really getting clever now. Although what they really need is for the all to tilt and turn and track the sun like a sunflower. all on their own.

    My FIL had 2 small turbines. awful. you need just the right wind and just the right wind speed. both had problems and he had them removed. they couldnt stand up to the gusts in his area of scotland.

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  6. forgot to say, look at this guys blog I have been reading it for years.

    The greening of gavin http://www.greeningofgavin.com/ He has solar.

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  7. Hi Sol. Thanks for telling us about solar panels. I know an agricultural machine repair man who installed a dynamo to his river and it produces electricity to run his electric machinery and he sells some to an electricity company. There are so many rivers which could have dynamo's and water wheels fitted to them for hydro electricity.

    Have looked at: The greening of gavin - Thanks! I follow a blog called: Lackan Cottage Farm. It's based in northern Ireland. They produce their own electricity too.

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  8. I try not to depend on electricity and the wood burner keeps us warm The bedrooms are just, well, cold. I haven't got a microwave and have never had one so what you've never had you never miss as they say. When we had the power cuts in the 1960s my father and brothers rigged up lorry batteries to power lights, the good old Lister engine to drive the milking parlour as a back up because we normally milked by electricity, and the Rayburn was always used to cook on. Lots of people around here now have their own wind turbines and produce their own power.

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    1. We can't flush the toilet and the cattle can't drink their water when we don't have electricity, Rachel. We usually use the microwave for keeping the bread in. Lister engines are brilliant, aren't they?

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  9. The phrase 'playing monsters in the dark with the wife if it was your birthday' has stuck in my head, and caused me no end of chuckles.

    But I agree about electricity......we absolutely depend on it. We will have a go with solar panels at some point in the future.....when we have time....when I have a 'proper' kitchen..........and the field fencing has been finished.....and the chicken hut made......etc....and etc..... There is long list to work through before we get to the solar panel project. Oh, and then there is the going off grid with water....etc....!

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    1. Glad it made you laugh, Vera.

      I would like solar panels. But we do like our range that runs off solid fuel. It's great to have plans for the smallholding isn't it?

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  10. When I was a child we lived in Dorset with no electricity, water from a well via a pump in the kitchen, open fires and a range in the kitchen. We had a gas fridge. In the early 60s we moved, we had electricity, hot running water, via a back boiler as well as an immersion heater, an electric cooker. I hated it! But then, I didn't bear the brunt of the work as a child. Many a time we ended up cooking the Yule dinner in a neighbours oven, over the fire, and saucepans on top of paraffin heaters, because of power cuts.
    Now, I try not to use more than I need. Use tilly lamps and candles and firelight quite a lot.
    Would not like to be without the fridge, freezer or washing machine. Interweb very important to me, living in a rural area.

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    1. Hi Irene. Apart from having no electric, your Dorset house sounds like our set up. Gas fridge. I went in Selfridges and asked them if they had a gas telly and they said: "No we only selfridges". I am joking.

      I couldn't live with out the old Tweb and Tinternet. Nor satellite television.

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  11. I'm too old to remember anything from the 80's Dave! 50's and 60's I remember. I guess it's what you grow up with.
    My Mother-in Law didn't have electricity until the early 90's and that was only because Age Concern insisted, she was in her eighties then and had raised her three children without it, she never did see the need, or even get to like it.

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    1. The Eighties seems like that another country, Anne. I remember phoning people on a Friday at 6.30 every week.

      Your MIL sounds amazing. My grandparent (here in Ireland) had a 'wireless' that was only turned on for the news!

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    2. Even when MIL had electricity she would still use her battery radio just for the news. She did have a DVD player as she was a musician, she taught piano and only gave up teaching when she was 92, she was a remarkable woman, sadly she died just one month before her 100'th birthday. Her brother is equally talented, he is an artist and still does the illustration's for Collins wild life books, he is now 92! coming up to 93 in April.

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  12. Gosh! Your MIL and her brother sound amazing people, Anne.

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  13. You may be eligible for a new government sponsored solar energy program.
    Find out if you are qualified now!

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