Monday, 19 November 2012

A 'Perfick' Smallholding.

I thought I would talk about some more great 'British Telly' again today.  Today's offering is 'The Darling Buds of May'.  In my humble opinion it was Yorkshire television and the writer H.E Bates masterpiece.  It really was to coin "Pop" Larkins classic catchphrase:

"Perfick."

The main characters in the television show were; Sidney "Pop" Larkin, Florence "Ma" Larkin, Mariette (the gorgeous Catherine Zeta Jones) and the tax collector "Charley.

The series depicted a glorious picture of 1950's rural Kent.  It was endearing, funny and evoked wonderful rural memories and nostalgia.  Best of all it was just 'sheer escapism'.  I am going to go on Ebay when I have finished writing this post and going to order myself the DVD collection of the 'Darling Buds of May' series.  Like I say it was:

"Perfick."

Here's a few snippets from the wonderful television series.  Catherine Zeta Jones is staggeringly beautiful.  See you in a day or two.


18 comments:

  1. not a lover of this old series as David Jason is an acquired taste!
    but fellow welshie Jones IS a bit of a beauty!

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  2. Hi John, I think David Jason played some classic comedy characters;
    "Ggg.. Granville" Open All Hours and 'Del Boy' in only fools and horses.

    Catherine Zeta is gorgeous.

    Thanks.

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  3. Lovely show - created an atmosphere of eternal bucolic summer! Thanks for the reminder, Dave.

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  4. Hi Carole. I love your 'eternal bucolic summer'. I can tell you are a scribe and writer.

    Thanks!!

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  5. Which part of Kent was this set in, Dave?

    Lived in Canterbury for four years and still miss the place, as well as Whitstable (brilliant Beer Festival beside the beach); Herne/Herne Bay/Reculver; Broadstairs (great week-long Folk Festival in the pubs) etc.

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  6. Didn't see the series, but read some of the books, they're very good as well.

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  7. Near Pluckley in Kent Pat. Do you know it? I have been to Canterbury, Folkestone and across to France on the channel tunnel. The farmhouse in the series is up for sale for 1.35 million pounds. It boasts a Oast house for drying hops, a Tudor barn and it's set on 20 acres. Think I might buy it. "Yeah right!" I just hope somebody buys it to 'farm' and it doesn't become a property development or just another 'holiday' home or for 'weekenders.' The ever sorrowful and winding story of the disappearing countryside.

    Thanks Pat.

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    1. Just seen that Pluckley is only five miles away from Ashford which I visited a few times, Dave.

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  8. Welcome back Cumbrian. Are you well and feeling refreshed? Please write us a report of your latest travels. I hope you got better weather than us Cumbrian? The veg garden is being put on hold for the moment. Think I will start growing rice!

    Yeah H.E Bates seems to have been quite a prolific writer doesn't he? The series was excellent. I have not yet read his books but I notice they are on Kindle.

    We are treating our selves to a Kindle reading device for Christmas. Apparently you can down load a Kindle application for free on to your computer or IPAD if you have a modern computer. There's quite a few free books too. Plus you can download a book in less than sixty seconds. The world is changing so so fast.

    I am also planning to get one of my manuscripts published on Kindle for Christmas. You heard it here first folks. What's it about? Allotments and it's supposed to make you laugh.

    Back to H.E Bates. He was born in Northamptonshire and he later moved to Kent. The television series is excellent Cumbrian.

    Sampled the Jeddah Gin the other day. It's very good and really strong. Thanks again for the recipe and guiding us through it.

    Thanks!!

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  9. It's a great programme, totally agree

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  10. Thanks Ronnie for your comment. If anything makes you want to live on a smallholding, it's the 'Darling Buds Of May'.

    Thanks.

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  11. Pleased the Jeddah Gin turned out well, I'm still struggling to get my gas bottle filled, more research required. Got a bottle from last but one brew, very nice too, good head and a nutty taste, I think it was nelsons Revenge, not 100% sure, must try and remember to label and date them. How's your brewing coming along?

    Weather in Gran Canaria nice and warm, hovering about 30, a bit of breeze to moderate it, just right. Good hotel as well, but full of Germans, it's a German chain I found out. But not the arrogant bolshy types you sometimes associate with Germans on holiday, and most of them spoke some English, better than my 4 or 5 words of German. Food excellent, 4 chefs in attendance carving from choice of 4 joits, all very good, suckling pig seemed popular, complete with heads; and grilling steaks and fish to order. Amazing choice of salads and sweets.

    Very mountainous island, roads worse than the Lake District, switch-backs and hair-pins the order of the day, some enen had safety barriers along the sheer 400' drop side; then you meet a 30-ton 40' artic, must be brave men to drive them.

    Landed back to gales and freezing rain, got home late and forgot to get milk, so powdered cappuccino had to make do, but OK when it's cold and wet.

    Autumn well and truly upon us, all the leaves are off the trees and on the drive and paths, it's grey, windy, raining and cold.

    Raggy cat waiting for us, sraight to the biccy bowl, but no milk for it either. Hasn't stirred from in front of the fire yet. Seems fairly plump though, must have been getting some protien from somewhere.

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  12. Thanks for that Cumbrian. I was hoping you would tell us all about Gran Canaria. It sounds excellent.

    The home brew is not so bad. We had a bad batch last week (you said we would) and I wonder if there was bacteria in the well water?

    Glad to hear Raggy Cat is happy and 'fairly plump'. He is a great self supporter.

    Thanks Cumbrian!!

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  13. Forgot to mention the "agriculture" which consists, as far as I could determine, of bananas, tomatoes and pineapples, most of which grow in structures that would look like big greenhouses but made of some sort of cloth, I called them big tents, about 8-10' high and acres (literally) in size.
    Actually got a glimpse of a small (about a dozen I guessed) herd of sleek-looking black & white cows, road too busy and too narrow to stop and take much notice of them, but they looked fit. And a flock of sheep and goats high up in the mountains.
    Most of the bits not covered by the big tents are sand, rock or too steep to support much, but there's a few trees high up and some aloe vera, none of them look like they've been planted there.
    Small hamlets and individual habitations all about the mountains, some of them clinging to a steep slopes and I couldn't see tracks to them, but occupied with washing on the line, so somebody must live there and presumably make a living.

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  14. Everybody gets a bad batch occasionally, doesn't seem any logical explanation for it, bit like farming I suppose, good seasons and bad ones?
    Could have been the bacteria in the water, but our (last) local brewery Jennings has been brewing using their own well water since 1841 I think it was, and it's supposed to be the water that makes the ale so good.
    If it's totally un-drinkable use it in slug pubs or pour it on the compost heap?

    Raggy cat's definitely a survivor, how's Domino?

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  15. I thought farming was all bad seasons, Cumbrian? I believe Burton On Trent is supposed habe the best water and beer because of it? I will throw it on the compost heap or make slug pubs with any undrinkable stuff. Thanks.

    Domino is getting fatter every day. Glad to hear Raggy cat is doing well. Still not found a stove to keep Domino warm. I don't want to put the oil on just for him. I supposed it will stop the damp though.

    Thanks.

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  16. Just found your comment, sorry Pat. I have been to Ashford when we went on the channel tunnel. That is one incredible architectural achievement. Could do with a bridge or tunnel from Ireland to England and Europe.

    Thanks.

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