Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Kitchen Sink Dramas.

I talked the other week about great English working class authors.  One of my favourite films and books is Billy Liar by Keith Waterhouse.  It was made in 1963, the year I was born.  If only they made films like that today.  Sheer escapism.  Billy Liar England's Walter Mitty.

I think my father based himself (I am joking) on Billy Liar's father.  Especially on a Saturday morning when he decide to hoover the whole of the house, banging into the skirting boards and shouting:

"I am up.  So we are all up."

One doesn't think he appreciated me coming in the early hours of the morning probably quite the worse for  wear.  I am sure we put our parents through Hell when we were growing up.  

Any way.  This is one of my favourite British films.  A classic kitchen sink drama/comedy.  It also introduced the world to Julie Christie.  I just love the way she struts her stuff without a care in the world.  If you have never seen the film.  You don't know what your missing.  You can watch it on You Tube.  

Here's a clip for your enjoyment.  Do you like this film?



6 comments:

  1. never seen the film, enjoyed the snippit will have to watch it now :-)

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    1. You are in for a treat Dawn. Tom Courtenay and Julie Christie are superb in it along with Wilfred Pickles, Leonard Rossiter.. It's one of my favourite English films.

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  2. Don't know how I missed this. Heard of it but never seen it. Brilliant

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    1. It's a cracker of a film LA. Did you see the HP sauce bottle on the table in the clip? What are your favourite films?

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  3. Wilfred Pickles ! Now that is a name from the past, I think he might have been one of the UK's first quiz masters ? For he had a catch phrase of "Open the box Mabel"

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  4. You are right Heron. He was one of the biggest quiz masters on British television and radio. I remember in the brilliant "For The Love Of Ada." I believe he use to say "Good neet" when he read the news during the war. Didn't they call the radio: "The theatre of the mind?" Thanks!

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