Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Making A Stinging Nettle Brew For The Garden And Veg Plot!

Its raining here today.  Yesterday I made some Stinging Nettle Garden tea fertilizer for the lawn, flowers and vegetables.  Why buy plant and lawn fertilizer when you can make your own for nuffink or even nowt?

I got an old pillowcase and put on my gardening gloves and used secateurs to cut and fill the pillowcase with nettles.  Then I tied it up and attached a piece of string to the pillowcase and tied to the handle of a bath full of rainwater.  




Then I dropped the pillowcase full of nettles into the bath and weighed it down with a big stone.  I have done this before with seaweed.  Some people use Comfrey.

In two weeks time I will use my nettle garden tea on my lawn, food and vegetables.  You are suppose to water it down: 10 -1.  I think the bath full of rainwater will dilute enough for me.  Anybody make their own garden brews?

18 comments:

  1. Mrs G sometimes washes her hair with nettle water.

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  2. Hi Gwil. Is it a shampoo? They are full of iron. Thanks!

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    1. I think she just grabs a handful, but not alongside doggie paths, and boils them in water and pours the resulting liquid, when it has cooled a bit, over her head.

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    2. Yes avoid the doggie and Tom cat paths. Supposed to be good for people who have bleached their hair a lot and also for baldness. Remember the Life of Brian scene: "I've been afflicted with a bald patch!" .

      Thanks Gwil!

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  3. I've just done the same myself this week, Dave! I mix nettles with pig manure (which helps weigh it down). It will be used to feed the tomatoes and aubergines.

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  4. Hi Philip. Please let us know how successful your crops are? I am interested to see how my lawn I newly seeded last year responds. Thanks!

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  5. Yes, I make the nettle brew! But I put the nettles in a dustbin full of water, and then close the lid. Things were busy last year and the brew never got looked at. You have reminded me to have a look at it. But do I have the courage! Because it is bound to smell something shocking!!!!

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  6. Thanks Vera. Sounds like a peg on the nose is needed? I am sure it won't be that bad. Do you have much success with your nettles brew? I have used my own homemade seaweed fertilizer. Must get some Comfrey plants. Thanks!

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  7. The nearest I come to that is my dandelion leaf tea Dave.

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  8. You and Heron got me into trying the herbal teas Rachel. I have some Turmeric teabags in the cupboard. We make Lemon Balm tea from the leaves of the plants we grow. Is Dandelion leaf tea good for you? Must give it a go. Thanks!

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    1. Dandelion tea well the old name is known as Piss a bed - that might give you a clue Dave :) ?
      Also said to be good for arthritic conditions and the kidneys.

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    2. Yes I heard it's a good Diuretic and good detox. We have forgotten so much about natural cures and practical uses on our doorsteps, garden, hedgerow...

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  9. We were just talking about this the other day. My son in law makes it for the garden. We also use crushed up egg shells and coffee grounds. The tomatoes love these. Diluted urine is supposed to be very good fertiliser too. Haven't tried that yet

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  10. Hi LA. I have plenty of cow muck but we wanted to make use of our free supply of stinging nettles. There are lots of free and natural sources of plant food aren't there? Thanks!

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  11. Brilliant. Saves money as well as being good for the veggies.

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  12. Thanks Valerie. They are good for the garden and are totally natural. The army use to make uniforms from nettles and they have so many other uses. Thanks!

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  13. I have a cupful of nettle tea every morning and sometimes in the evening brilliant stuff for old men.
    Comfrey again an excellent herb for all sorts of uses and known in the trade as bonenit, also good for sprains and other ailments as well as a feed for plants at 10 to 1.

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  14. Hi Heron. All good information. My English Grandfather called Comfrey 'knitbone'. Apparently they use to place the leaves in bandages to heal fractured bones. I find Herbal renedies and uses for wild plants really interesting. Thanks!

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