Friday, 9 April 2021

One Of My Fuchsia Shrubs In Flower In April.


 I made over twenty Fuchsia shrub cuttings last year.  I was topping them up with compost and removing any grass, weeds or moss yesterday morning.  I noticed one of them is flowering already. They usually flower from June onwards.

Fuschia hedges are very common in the West of Ireland.  They originate in Chile.  The shrub fuschia in my garden looks like its Fuschia Alba.  They have salmon pink/white flowers.  

They do really well down here on the Gulf stream  and they are rarely damaged by frosts like they are in the Midlands and the North of the country.

Fuschia is a relatively easy plant to propagate by cuttings.  They make good hedges and ornamental shrubs.  You save lots of money taking your own cuttings and propagating your own plants.

The bees love climbing inside the flowers and getting drunk on the nectar.  

Have you had success making Fuschia cuttings?


A native fuschia hedge for Debby.  On the right hand side is some of my fuschia Alba hedging.  







19 comments:

  1. To answer your question, I have had zero success making fuschia cuttings as I have never tried to make any. However, I have had success making newspaper cuttings about Hull City AFC and the day we walloped Man United 2-0. It was November 23rd 1974 and I was there.

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    1. 1906 was a good year when Mufc beat Hull City 5 nil YP. Fuschia cuttings propagation is a good hobby in the countryside.

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  2. We have a couple of the common dark red/purple variety in our garden and one pale pink, which has smaller flowers. No idea what it is called. The common variety does really well over here and blooms profusely all along the roadsides.

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    1. Sounds like Fuschia Magellanica JayCee. The IOM was once part of Ireland so I can understand why find it over there. I've seen similar Fuschia hedges in Cornwall.

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  3. I love fuschia, but have never seen it grown as a hedge. Here they are bought in hanging baskets and used on front porches and the like. Not only have I never been able to make cuttings, I cannot manage to keep one to save my soul, and I don't know why. I have had them at multiple homes, multiple porches, etc and I have always managed to kill them. Our neighbor has two or three of them every year on his front porch and they are beautiful. I can SEE them from my porch, and in my heart, a very deep and dark envy blooms. Now THAT seems to thrive. If I lived next door to a fuschia hedge, I'd be a bitter woman indeed.

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    1. Hi Debby. Sounds like your neighbours fuschias are the tender ornamental variety. These need to be housed for winter. I have updated my blog and posted one of my native hedges for you.

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  4. There is a wonderful essay on the fuscia by Irish essayist Chris Arthur - he weaves a web of meaning and history into one simple flower and comments on their popularity in Ireland

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  5. thanks for the post, I am reminded how much I like fuschia's and am going to get one for my tiny garden.
    Briony
    x

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  6. Our old neighbour has pits and pots of fuschia, all full of colour in the summer. I'm she propagates hers. I haven't had a fuschia in years. May get a cutting

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  7. Hi Briony. Yes they are very nice and the bees love them. You will find some good varieties online.

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  8. Sounds like a neighbour well worth knowing Linda. I think you could gain some skills and new fuschia plants talking to them.

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  9. Thank you for the picture. I am off to look up fuschia hedges. That would be a marvel.

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  10. Your very welcome Debby. Fuchsia is named a after the German botanist Dr Leonard Fuchs. It's native to central America. I often wonder how it got to Ireland. Perhaps Sir Walter Raliegh brought it back with Myrtle trees, tobacco and potatoes? Or perhaps it was just washed up on these shores by the Gulf Stream? I like reading about the etymology of our vegetables and plants which often turn out to not being native at all.

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  11. Alas and alack, I shall never know the wonder of a fuschia hedge. I live in a zone 5b and the hedgerow will only survive in 6a zone or better.

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  12. Sorry to hear that Debby. They don't like frost like the potatoes and tomatoes don't either.

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  13. Hi Dave
    I usually propagate fuchia cuttings by rooting them in water. I must get some hardy ones,we dont have any here.
    Kathy

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  14. Hi Kathy. If you lived near me I would give you fuschia shrubs. The hardy varieties are relatively easy to strike and grow roots.

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