Sunday, 27 June 2021

Pernicious Weeds.

 Pernicious weeds.  No it's not the name of a Prog Rock band that once played Glastonbury Festival way back when.  I'm  talking about weeds (or wild flowers) that drive gardeners mad.

One such pernicious weed is Ground Elder. It resembles the Elder tree with it's flowers in particular:


I think its a pretty flower.  The Roman's are said to have introduced it to the UK and England even.  Why do news reporters never say England any more?  

Ground Elder is a member of the carrot family.  And it's pernicious rhisomes/ roots drive gardeners mad.  Some people use glyphosphate weed killers to eradicate it.  Stoic gardeners like myself pull it out and live with it even though it can be a nuisance.

In  Ireland the ancient monks are said to have introduced it to be used for a cure for gout and arthritis.  

Do you have a pernicious weed that drives you mad?  Would you use weedkillers to eradicate it or can you live with it like me? Soil slaves of the world unite!🎤😊






15 comments:

  1. I can live wit our weeds. This year I am pulling a lot of sticky willy out at the bottom end of the garden. My least favourite "weed" is ivy. I agree with you - Why are they always talking about the bloody "UK"? I have never liked that term. I try to avoid it as much as possible. When they ask on official forms: What is your nationality? I often put Yorkshire or Yorkshireman.

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  2. I do love that word - pernicious. It has a lovely ring to it.

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  3. I agree with you about your UK observations YP. I see they have a North of England Correspondent too? Why don't they have a South of England Correspondent?

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  4. Yes pernicious is a good word JayCee. I also like wheelbarrow. The wheelbarrow was invented by the Chinese many many years ago.

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  5. The searing sun has got rid of 99.9percent of our pernicious weeds but they're there, hiding underground waiting to reappear and strangle anything edible. However, I don't think we have this particular pernicious weed. And don't want it either, thank you

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  6. Searing sun? That's a great description Linda . Ground Elder have underground rhisome like roots They are easily broken off and left behind when weeding. Rotavators are very good for chopping up these weeds and making more plants. It's an hard weed to eradicate, especially if you're like me and won't use weedkillers like glyphosphate.

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  7. Mint, spurge, dandelion, and crabgrass, plus another one I cannot think of the name right now.

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  8. smart weed is the other. Lambs-quarter too.

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  9. They all make food for the bees and insects Debbby. I think weeds should be called wild flowers.

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    1. I believe that. In a flower garden, they would not be half a problem. However, when they are choking out my vegetables, it is another story altogether. By the way, my name is Hebrew for little bee. One would think that would make me a bit fonder of weeds, yet...it doesn't! My cucumbers are really starting to do what they're supposed to do. Passive hydroponics seems to be quite efficient.

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    2. I agree with you Debby, weeds are a nuisance in a vegetable garden and can enhance a flower garden. Can't wait to see your hydroponic photos.

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    3. Took a batch specifically for you. As soon as I get a minute, I will get them posted. I am very pleased!

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    4. Great to read Debby. Hydroponics sound very interesting.

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  10. The reason the Romans brought ground elder with them is that it's a useful vegetable in a lean time of the year, packed with vitamin C and tastes like cabbage. You must eat it young, otherwise it can give you the runs. I make a useful green powder to add to soups and stew over the winter from ground elder, nettle leaves and whatever herbs are abundant in the garden, usually marjoram, lovage and possibly mint.

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  11. Thanks for the heads up about Ground Elder Sarah. I suppose it prevented Scurvy on long sea journeys.

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