Monday 20 November 2023

"Easy Peelers"

 

Would you put an "Easy Peeler" in someone's Christmas stocking?

We always called them Tangerines 🍊 when I was growing up.  Nowadays supermarkets call them "Easy Peelers".

Apparently according to Professor Google they are seedless Clementines or Satsumas that are easy to peel with your fingers. They are not Tangerines.

I still call them Tangerines. Do you call them that?

So why do we put them in our Christmas stockings?  Apparently they were considered exotic especially to people from "Oop North".    

So true.  We also kept coal in the barf and use our internal doors, architraves and skirting boards for firewood in Winter.

Someone old I once worked with said they had never see a banana until the 1950s.  

Nowadays you can get strawberries 🍓 in winter.  Everything's flown in or comes in the back of a lorry from a heated greenhouse in 🇳🇱 Holland.

I suppose a Tangerine in your Christmas stocking meant that you were getting something different than a Granny  Smiths 🍎 apple or a packet of Custard Creams.  What happened to Curly Wurlys, Snake belts, Caramac and Strike Cola?

Do you call Tangerines "Easy Peelers?"


20 comments:

  1. We seem to only get satsumas here. Haven't seen a tangerine for ages but to be honest I prefer the taste of satsumas anyway. Ours are labelled easy peeler satsumas. We used to get a foil wrapped chocolate coin in our Christmas stocking along with a satsuma. Both were gone before breakfast!

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  2. We buy our "Easy Peelers" from Lidl JayCee. My dog once ate all the chocolate coins hanging from the Christmas 🎄.

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    1. In our old house I once found some shredded silver foil behind the armchair just before Christmas. We realised that a mouse had climbed up onto a high shelf to steal a chocolate Santa that P was saving for himself. Mousey was soon trapped and despatched....

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    2. Poor Mickey Mouse ate P's chocolate Santa' and was executed for his gluttony at Christmas. Do you have any church mouses?

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    3. There's nothing poorer than a church mouse. Hymn books and Hassocks is the staple diet for the ecclesiastical rodent.

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  3. I used to put a mandarine and a walnut in grandkids Xmas stockings. They thought it was very weird and actually when I thought about it, well, it really was weird. End of that. Now they get chocolates and Xmas Sox or something equally boring. At least they love the chocolate

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  4. Wasn't "Easy Peeler" a hit song by Phil Collins?

    I have noticed the lazy renaming of this fruit too. Perhaps it is time to rename all fruit so...
    banana = unzipper
    eating apple = muncher
    morello cherry = purple nipple
    plum = juicy testicle
    Have you got any suggestions for a melon or a bunch of grapes?

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    1. I am not a Pharmacist YP. They sound painful. You should work in advertising.

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    2. "Find peace in the secret beauty of The Sheep Shed Peninsula way down on The Emerald Isle's gorgeous south western riviera. You will have a restful stay in luxury polytunnel accommodation on the exclusive Northsider Estate where you will enjoy traditional cuisine from Lord and Lady Northsider's own rustic kitchen. Learn animal husbandry and how to play the ancient Celtic harp before plunging into the balmy waters of Bantry Bay. An authentic and unmissable Irish experience for those who dare to live..." Contact Yorkshire Pudding Holidays Ltd.

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    3. I will have two tickets please.

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  5. You can never get enough socks Linda. Lidl Chrostmas jumpers are in store. Apparently St Nicholas left some gold coins in some poor children's stockings hung up over the fire.

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  6. I call them all "little oranges". Never heard of "easy peelers", but until now would have assumed it meant something smutty.

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  7. You mustn't shop in Lidl Tasker. Perhaps strippers and exotic dancers buy them?

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  8. Tangerines (named for their origin Tangiers) are exotic where I came from. Mostly we had navel oranges and very occasionally mandarins (which is what I'd call those little orange things, although the skin seldom came off so easily as it seems to do on the latest varieties). The best ones I have ever pigged out on we bought at a roadside stall in Croatia on our way home from Greece. 10kg of them didn't last the trip to Calais!

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    1. Didn't know the origin of Tangerines TM. I have seen people selling net bags of oranges in the Algarve and the aroma from the orange groves in April was sublime.

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  9. Here they are called 'cuties'. Oranges always remind me of this story: my children's great grandfather grew up next to a Nez Perce reservation. As a child, he was playing in the river. Suddenly, there were scores of oranges floating down the river. They were amazed, never having seen them before. They did not even recognize them as food. They gathered them up as fast as they could, getting piles of them. A train had crashed off a bridge far upriver and dumped its load into the river. The children were amazed to discover they could be eaten and he said nothing in his life ever tasted so good than his first bite of orange.

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  10. We have mandarins which are very easy to peel, but don't put them in Christmas stockings. That's a very old tradition going way back to when oranges were not so readily available, apparently not grown in England, and had to be shipped in at great cost so getting one at Christmas was a real treat. I remember old history lessons where we learned such things.

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  11. Thanks for the heads up River. I was once told by an elderly man he never saw a banana until the nineteen fifties.

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