Wednesday 4 October 2023

Organic Carrots Packed in Plastic Bags.

 I went in Tesco's recently and took this photo:

I asked myself why do they need to be packed in plastic?

Does it preserve their shelf life, keep them altogether and weighed appropriately or is it the hygiene police  who insist it is to stop us handling them with our dirty fingers?  Perhaps you know of some other reason why they pack them in plastic?

The "Organic" 🥕s are said to have been grown in the Netherlands and Israel.  So perhaps they flew them to 🇮🇪?

I was reading online the other day they have found plastic in the rain clouds.  I wonder if we get plastic particles on our shop bought vegetables?

Surely ("Don't call me Shirley!) The plastic packaging makes the vegetables sweat and the sugars turn to starch so much quicker?

What's  wrong with selling them loose or in paper bags or even bring back string bags?

Do we really need to wrap our fruit and vegetables in plastic?

23 comments:

  1. From my experience, plastic wrapped veg has a much shorter shelf life than loose or paper wrapped. As it happens, our local Tesco Extra has most of its veg loose in trays, just a handful of the prepared range in plastic.

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  2. Thanks Will. That's good to read. You can not beat fresh unwrapped vegetables. Better still. Homegrown.

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  3. I agree and wish they would stop wrapping fruit and veg in plastic. Plastic is a menace, plus I often want to buy one apple or one carrot and not a whole bag.

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    Replies
    1. 'Fresh and Unwrapped' would be a good way of advertising organic vegetables Terra.

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  4. You are not the only one to have asked that question. In some supermarkets vegetables are now displayed more loosely but on the whole they remain in plastic bags - easier to handle with bar codes attached.

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    1. I didn't think of the bar codes. What about breathable paper bags?

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    2. Breathable paper bags? Isn't that a description of The Tory Party?

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    3. Whinge Bags would be a more apt description YP. All those years in power and they still blame the opposition.

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  5. String bags would be best...partly they are in plastic to separate them from anything that might contaminate them I suppose...and to differentiate from other carrots they aren't exactly the things you could just stick a label on like an organic apple

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    Replies
    1. They could be tied up in bundles with their tops left on with an organic label GZ.

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  6. One reason is so the store knows they are organic and can charge the correct price. If left unwrapped anybody could buy them and say they are regular carrots and be getting the good stuff at a cheaper price.

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  7. Good point. Perhaps they should have big areas just for Organic fruit and vegetables River?

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    1. Like they do here, with individual stickers on things like apples etc. with different barcodes from the regular stuff.

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  8. Since covid hardly any fruit and veg are sold loose anywhere. I used to have some re-usable veg bags in by shopping bags to use for weighing loose veg but there is no point anymore.

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  9. Hi Sue. Yes I suppose covid and winter flu/colds are good reasons for packing vegetables. I notice potatoes are often sold in strong paper bags some with handles and with breathable holes instead of plastic. So it can be done.

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  10. A year or so ago all our carrots in the supermarket suddenly showed up in those same plastic bags. We were all really annoyed but nothing we can do. Its an EU thing. Why? Your guess is as good as mine. ]
    At the smaller grocers carrots are still in plastic bags but they are 10 or 20 kilo bags and you can put your hands in and choose the carrots you want. At the market they are still thank goodness sold with carrots tops and a bit of soil.

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    1. 🥕 tops and a bit of soil sound so natural Linda. Better still we should be able to buy them direct out of the ground from a grower and even grow some our selves. They love sandy sil so you should be able to grow whoppers.

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  11. Ahhh my favorite hobby horse. On a tangential note, out VET had advised us (during a consultation for the late Mr T) that science has established a link between feeding animals out of plastic bowls and chronic kidney disease. If it applies to animals then why not also to us?

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    1. Really? That makes me glad my Lola doesn't have plastic dishes. She eats and drinks from the old china cereal bowls my kids used when they were young.

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    2. I think pot or stainless steel dishes are the way to go River.

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  12. Very interesting what your VET advised you Tiggers Mum. It makes you wonder how much plastic we ingest?

    I have also read there is evidence that aluminium cans and kitchen appliances like kettles have links to Parkinsons. Handling granulated fertilizer with bare hands is also said to not be advised.

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    1. My Dad threw out all my Mum's aluminium pots years ago when he read there might be a link between aluminium and either dementia or Parkinsons. Mum called it wasteful but liked her shiney new stainless steel pans.

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  13. Yes stainless steel pans look great. I think beer cans are made of aluminium. I wonder if there's axlik to dementia with them?

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