Friday 24 March 2023

Slug Pub Traps.

We were shopping in Euro Giant in Limerick the other day and I noticed 2 slug traps for sale for 2 Euros.


Ever since I converted the little field into my veg plot over twenty years ago.  I have tried not to use any weedkillers, artificial fertilizers or pesticides except for slug pellets that is.

The Emerald isle is a very wet and damp and mild climate and perfect habit for slugs and snails.

I don't really like using slug pellets because I don't know what they do to our food, our environment, local wildlife like birds and most importantly to US!

So instead of having an heated debate with the missus about using them I purchased these two two slug pub traps.  

You just fill them with a bit of  El Cheapo beer or fruit juice and old Sluggy or Snaily will have last drink and drown.

They also have roofs to keep the rain out.  

I suppose you could make your own?  But for only two Euros it's a no brainer.  It's good to see plastic actually being useful in the garden!

I suppose you could always go round the garden with a torch 🔦 and 🪣 and collect the slugs and snails and feed them to your hens and ducks or go round sprinkling salt on them?

How to you deal with vegetable predators?

22 comments:

  1. My way of dealing is to not plant vegetables, it isn't only slugs and snails I have to contend with, there are millipedes, earwigs, cockroaches, spiders, ants and birds. Very sadly I killed one of the blue-tongue lizards that live within the complex by putting out snail and slug pellets one year, not knowing they would kill the lizard.

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    1. Hi River. I have often wondered what slug pellets do to to the wildlife if the ingest them. Brassica are like sheep and seem to have a death wish or host of problems: caterpillars, cabbage whites and, birds and snails and slugs not forgetting old allotment illnesses like Club Foot or "Finger and Toe".

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  2. And possums, they swing in the trees and pee all over my philodendrons and monsteras. The stink is appalling.

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    1. Leprechauns and weeds are our biggest problem.

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  3. They do work well..just check them regularly to haul out the black beetles that you do need in the garden...they also devour slugs eggs and possibly small slugs

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  4. Yes GZ black beetles drowning did concern me. I wish I could persuade an hedgehog to patrol the vegetable plot or perhaps I should dig a wildlife pond and encourage frogs to help control the slugs and snails?

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  5. We have a hedgehog who patrols our garden so hopefully he is keeping down the slug numbers. The thrush often has snail for breakfast. We find the shells on the path. If I come across any slugs they get as-salted.

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  6. Does hedgehog have a name JayCee? What about Spike? We have three cats who keep the rats and mice at bay and occasionally they catch a thrush or a pie tailed wagtail, sadly.

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    1. The hedgehog has a very unimaginative name of Hedgie.
      I think the neighbourhood cats that stalk our garden are keeping the bird population down as we don't see very many, despite nesting boxes feeders and bird baths.

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  7. Hedgie is a cool name JayCee. Do you leave Hedgie dog food treats? I use to know someone who left dog food out for a rat every night. He swore it was the same rat that visited every day. Well it did have a long tail and a brown coat. True story!😊

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  8. Our garden is full of snails which I gather and throw next door but I've never seen a slug. Next door is just a deserted paddock by the way. I'm quite happy to let them live there

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  9. Hi Linda. They will probably make their way back at snail pace. Snails have evolved very efficiently and crawl into the shell or house on their backs when they sun shines whilst slugs need wet and long vegetation to hide in. The Emerald Isle is the perfect location for the blighters!

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  10. Occasionally I do use a few slug pellets though I never like doing it. Apart from anything else, I do not enjoy killing slugs as they are beautiful creatures that live fascinating lives. I would rather kill Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg than a pair of garden slugs. Good luck with your beer traps!

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  11. Just been reading about Metaldehyde YP. Apparently it's the main ingredient of manufactured slug pellets. It's lethal to mammals and slugs but doesn't do anything detrimental to earthworms. I would question that and have noticed the earthworm population is dropping alarmingly. I won't be using slug pellets again. Hopefully I can persuade the missus to no buy or use them either.

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  12. Apparently Metaldehyde slug pellets were banned in Blighty in April 2022.

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if I will be able to buy some on the black slug market.

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    2. I am not certain as to what is in the organic slug pellets...but they do seem to work

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    3. I think organic slug pellets contain iron phosphate GZ. They break down and add iron to the soil

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  13. We use slug collars (hosta halos), beer traps, slow worms, and hair clippings to discourage gastropods in the garden. We also use copper tape on pots and copper impregnated matting under seed trays. We tried nematodes one year but with no measurable difference in slug predation. None of this is perfect but that slug pellet chemical apparently doesn't break down in the soil so just keeps building up and it was never perfect either.

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  14. Hosta Halos is a brilliant description Tigger. Yes I have read they don't like copper. Spreading fresh seaweed around your brassica is also said to give good results because they hate the salt. In my experience of vegetable growing it's always one kick forwards one kick backwards. You are one clever cat Tigger.

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  15. I have a grandson. He is paid a penny for each slug he salts. He's a bargain.

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  16. Sounds like a true mutual business agreement Debby and both parties are very happy with the deal. It's easier than going round with a torch and bucket to collect the slugs and snails.

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