Tuesday 14 May 2024

Second Time Flowering Already This Year.

 

Bergenia Cordifolia or elephants ears or pig squeak.

Great English plantswoman and garden designer  Gertrude Jekyll use to plan her gardens using them to form rows in her herbaceous perennials gardens.

I am more a patchwork quilt informal cottage gardener.

The Bergenias originate in China and Russia and their leaves change colour when they aren't  in flower.

Interestingly ours flowered in late winter/ early spring.  I noticed after the heavy rain on Sunday night one of them is back in flower.

May is beginning to  look very much like a typical April with sunshine and showers.

The Bergenia comes back every year and I have propagated lots of them.  Perennials are so much better value than annuals.

Do you like informal cottage gardens are you more of a concrete, grass and shrubs type of gardener?

10 comments:

  1. Definitely informal...and mostly the flowers are on the fruit bushes ๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜„

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  2. Totally agree GZ. I haven't got any fruit bushes anymore. My apple trees always lost their blossom in the spring gales. Lashing with rain here today but everything looks so verdant. I guess the weeds will also like the rain?๐Ÿ˜Š

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  3. Ours is slightly formal but not exactly regimented. It is a covenant on the property that the gardens are maintained so as not to "cause a nuisance" to the neighbours!

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  4. I would imagine your ecclesiastical garden is mature and very attractive and full of the plants and shrubs that are traditional to the area JayCee? I would love to see some photos sometime on your blog. It's very quiet in blogging land now Mr Pudding is holidaying in his villa in the Algarve. Back to the rain again here. The plants will like it unlike us.

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  5. I like a formal garden. It's like to see flowers arranged in a pattern, colours together, everything neat and tidy. It's nice to look at. But .. I'd never have my own garden like that. I like a bit of wildness and surprise.
    Concrete and shrubs?? No, no.

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  6. Hi Linda. I like visiting formal big house country estate gardens like Muckross House and Glin Castle that I have featured on here. I love traditional English cottage gardens in town and the country. Lots of work but bags of interest and hopefully Lots of colour.

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  7. Definitely informal. We even leave our front lawn (where the bergenia abounds) to go wild from spring until the grass seeds later in the summer. You are lucky to get second flowers.

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  8. I live in the countryside next to the sea Tigger's Mum and I like everything to be part of the vista and blend in together. It's a never ending battle trying to have perennials and shrubs growing next to fields of grass. We are lucky to get a second flowering. The flowers are mixes up like the seasons. I even have vegetables going to seed after the recent week of dry weather and now it's back to the rain.

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  9. I am more of a toss it and see what grows. For the first time, I am trying to be mindful and put things together in a planned way. That is what happens when you read the ramblings of plantaholics!๐Ÿ˜œ

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  10. After our wet autumn, winter and spring. I am grateful for any flower. Be it a cultivated species or a daisy in the lawn, a Gorse Bush, wild flower like primrose or even my beloved Osteospermums and Shasta Daisies. Enjoy your garden. I think you are Debby, Anonymous?

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