Tuesday 1 November 2022

Somewhere Outside Tokyo Invented Time.

Sunday night seemed to drag forever after the clocks went back at two on Sunday morn ing.  It was time for my twice a year speech: 

'This time yesterday it would be seven o'clock now.  But it's only six."

Somebody would reply:

"Yes we bloody know.  You say this every year".

Why do they change clocks and make the Autumn nights even longer?   We are not first world war ammunition workers who need extra light.  That's why they  changed the clocks in the first place.

Songs like Cher's "If I could turn back time" come to mind in my mental jukebox.  I wonder who invented time?

My grandfather in Ireland could look at the bay and the tide and tell you what time of day it was.  He needed no watch.  He was a fisherman and a farmer and the seasons were his visual calendar.

I never understood why school children need to get up early on a Winters morning.  Why can't they start school at 9.30 or 10 even?

Regular readers will remember I finally got to see Hugh Cornwell at A New Day festival in Kent in August.  He was a member of the Stranglers who were a favourite band of my youth along with Thin Lizzy and Kansas of course.

I use to play their  Black and White album religiously over and over again and the lyrics became like poetry to my ears.  When I play them today I can remember all the lyrics. Here's one of my favourite tracks about time and my blog title;





10 comments:

  1. I agree with you about changing the clocks. I dislike the dark evenings. It makes me want to curl up and sleep for six months.

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  2. Especially when you live in a rural area with no street lights. Putting the clocks back an hour prolongs the Autumn and Winter evenings and nights and we have to use more electricity especially lights JayCee. Thanks.

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  3. There are lots of reasons why it is a bad idea to change the clocks.These include messing with small children's sleeping routines, the possibility of life-changing accidents when going up ladders or church towers to re-set clocks, upsetting the mental well-being of delicately balanced humans and missed appointments. In contrast I can see no real advantages in changing the clocks - even though I am familiar with the tired old arguments that supporters trundle out when this question is asked. William Willett has a lot to answer for.

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  4. William Willet probably thought it was a good idea in the era he lived trying to use natural daylight and save electricity generated by coal YP. Which was in short supply in world war one. You list some very good and valid points for not changing the clocks. Thanks for your thoughts.

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  5. Agreed, agreed, agreed. Why change the damn clocks. Greece was going to stay on one time, so they said some years ago. We are still waiting.

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  6. I read something similar Linda that the EU were going to stop changing the clocks but it's never happened. I suppose there is also a financial cost altering every clock? At least my mobile phone time automatically changes itself. Thanks.

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  7. Milking and farming in general always likes to have light mornings. Many occupations start early. The cows take a week to adjust to the clock change.

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  8. True Rachel. I think people in villages and towns can avail of the pavements and street lights. Living in the countryside Winter seems so much longer with the dark nights. Thanks.

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  9. And Tiggers hate the disruption to breakfast times (and his humans hate being woken up to be told about it.)

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  10. Good point Tigger. Four legged friends are creatures of habit and like their meals on time every day.

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