Tuesday, 24 May 2022

More Photographs From Killarney.

Here's some more photographs of our visit to Muckross gardens in Killarney county Kerry yesterday:



Rhododendrons in flower.

Dinosaurs food, Giant Rhubarb or even Gunnera.  They love damp and create shade. They originate in South America and their umbrella like leaves catch the Irish rain.




American Skunk Cabbage.  Originally from North America it was introduced to large gardens to be an ornamental but is now considered invasive and a garden escapee.  It's yellow flowers are said to give off a foul Skunk like odour.

10 comments:

  1. Co-incidentally, I also give off a foul skunk-like odour after a slap up curry meal. Not straight away. The internal chemistry takes three or four hours to create the necessary eruptions. No wonder my nickname is Vesuvius.

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  2. Can't beat hot hot food YP. I had my favourite Korean dish last night: amber fire beef from the Asian takeaway. Hot, hot, hot!

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    1. Crikey. That stuff burns on the way in and the way out.

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    2. Aye. Wise to have a jar of "Sudocrem" ready.

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    3. Yep! It's difficult to find "hot, bot" spicy food in Ireland. They don't seem to like spicy food over here. When I was younger it was a matter of going to the Indian restaurant after the pub and drinking at least four pints of lager (on top of bitter) and ordering the hottest curry you could find and leaving half of it!🌢

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  3. It certainly does JayCee.😊

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  4. That makes me laugh that skunk cabbage was considered an ornamental plant. That being said though, I was shocked to discover that it flowered. I have never seen this, and it has to have been because I have never looked for it, because skunk cabbage is all along the river here. PS: if you crush the leaves, you will discover why it is called skunk cabbage.

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  5. It reminded me of a banana plant Debby. I like Dickonsia Antartica tree ferns. There's a tree forest of them at Kells Gardens on the Ring of Kerry. They were used for ballast to fill the returning prison ships from Botany Bay and some one threw them in the sea at Falmouth and someone noticed them sprouting and planted them in estate gardens. Japanese knotweed was introduced also for a garden ornamental and game ground cover and look what problems it's caused. Even Rhododendrons have been invasive in Killarney country park and need to be managed. Yet not all none native plants are invasive.

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  6. The Rhodos really are a blaze of colour. Lovely and anything so vibrant and green gets my vote. Everything is slowly turning brown here

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  7. Great garden description Linda. There's Greek food and drink for sale at you know where from Thursday.

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